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Dellenbaugh

Mary

Dellenbaugh

Validated Lead Expert

Generic Skills

B.1. Understanding of integrated and sustainable urban development: 
My bachelor of science in forest science, my masters in landscape architecture and my doctorate in cultural geography have equipped me well to address the complex challenges that arise in urban areas from an ecological, architectural, and cultural/social perspective. Based on this broad background, I offer strategies and solutions to integrated urban renewal that simultaneously address local identity, cooperative economic forms, ecological sustainability, and the involvement of cultural and creative industries. I am the author and editor of multiple works on these topics, including an edited volume about urban commons and a forthcoming monograph about urban development through culture. I have addressed subjects such as authenticity in urban branding and integrated design strategies in shrinking contexts in multiple book chapters and refereed journal articles. I am currently or have previously been part of several international scientific review committees covering these and other urban issues. In addition to numerous talks at academic and policy conferences throughout Europe, including invitations to speak at the Heinrich Böll Foundation and the Berlin Architecture Biennale, I have also lectured at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the Freie Universität and moderated policy workshops at conferences organized by the Berlin Senate Department for Labour, Integration and Women’s Issues.
B1. Assessment: 
1: The applicant demonstrates more than 2 years of experience with integrated and sustainable urban development. She has a masters in landscape architecture and doctorate in cultural geography. She is author and editor in topics such as integrated urban renewal that simultaneously address local identity, cooperative economic forms, ecological sustainability, and the involvement of cultural and creative industries. especially within the field of social and sustainable housing (e.g. post graduate diploma in Town Planning and 30+ years of professional experience).
B.2. Understanding of exchange and learning processes at transnational level: 
Cooperation across borders, whether in person at meetings or conferences, or at a distance using digital platforms and tools, is a fundamental component of my working life. From organizing international conferences and workshops during my doctoral research and postdoctoral positions at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, to maintaining working collaborations between highly-engaged partners across Europe, I am not only adept at keeping partners in long-term projects and partnerships motivated, but also maintaining momentum and structure even during difficult periods. My ability to multitask and my skill in coordination and organization are demonstrated by my management of multiple simultaneous projects and cooperations. Examples from my CV include my role as co-founder of the Urban Research Group at the Georg Simmel Centre for Metropolitan Research, my ensuing role as main organizer of our 2013 conference “Urban Commons: Moving beyond State and Market” and head of the editing team for the resultant publication, and my position as EU project manager and policy consultant (2015 – 2016) in which I managed three EU projects for two companies while also working as a policy consultant for the Berlin Senate Department for Labour, Integration and Women’s Issues’ Europe Agency. These and other experiences have honed my skills in clear and goal-oriented communication, efficient and effective meetings, digital collaboration strategies, time management and workflow planning.
B2. Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides transnational activities that demonstrate her understanding of exchange and learning processes at transnational level (e.g. organizer of the 2013 conference “Urban Commons: Moving beyond State and Market” and she was EU project manager and policy consultant, where she managed three EU projects for two companies).
B.3. Proficiency in English: 
I am an English native speaker. My years-long, international experience in public speaking in academic, policy, and civil society contexts has allowed me to hone my communication skills with different groups and audiences with disparate starting points, English capabilities, backgrounds and perspectives. I am well versed in presenting information effectively in order to reach goals, stimulate discussion and promote cooperation and co-learning, in particular with non-native English speakers. In addition, learning a second language, German, up to complete professional proficiency has sensitized me even further to the potential pitfalls of intercultural communication, above all in a shared second language, such as idioms, regional colloquialisms and dialects.
B3. Assessment: 
1: The applicant demonstrates proficiency in English (native speaker).

Expertise for the design and delivery of transnational exchange and learning activities:

C.3.1. Ability to communicate complex concepts to non-English speakers: 
The range and variety of my work contexts (academic conferences, policy conferences, project meetings, university teaching, stakeholder engagement meetings, public lectures) mean that I am constantly adapting my content, language use, and presentation style to my audiences’ needs and backgrounds. I teach a university-level course in English about Berlin's urban development from its genesis to current day. My students come from a variety of exchange programmes (ERASMUS, direct exchange, country-specific programmes). Their English proficiency and backgrounds vary widely, which requires me to practice not only presenting complex material to a varied audience, but also hone my communication skills with non-native speakers. I speak slowly and clearly, avoid contractions and idioms, and define any specific terms in my presentation slides, so that there is a visual cue as well. I also use handouts, slides, and readings to supplement my lectures. In a business or policy context, I often employ handouts with a short summary of the key points and terms in audience-appropriate and non-idiomatic English. If I am aware that English may be a problem, I speak slowly, enunciate, and use simple vocabulary and short sentences. I rely strongly on visual cues. The information presented in the summary handouts represents the core message in the presentation supplemented by visuals such as icons, pictures, flowcharts, graphs or infographics.
C3.1 Assessment: 
0: The applicant only provides an example of how to communicate complex concepts non-native English speakers, which is not asked (should be to non English speakers)
C.3.2. Ability to draw out, support the verbalization and documentation of knowledge and practice from participants: 
As already stated, I employ templates and structured inputs (filling out tables or surveys, completing questionnaires) to standardize and structure inputs from partners and encourage conformity of the quality and quantity of the material that they deliver. Providing a highly structured template or input format can be a good way to reduce stress in the initial meetings, and also later between more experienced and less experienced partners. I used templates in all three EU projects that I managed for the gsub & MetNet (GUIDE+, Euro-IVET, Jump@School). In the project GUIDE+, having each partner fill out a competency table based on the results of their local kick-off then informed the cooperative initial development of a curriculum structure at the next meeting. After project meetings for the EU projects that I coordinated, I made a point of conducting anonymous online surveys of the partners to assess how each partner was satisfied with the partnership, the information exchange, etc. I then summarized and presented these results at the next meeting to build on successes and identify areas for improvement. In these projects, I was also responsible for preparing background materials. This was the case for example in the project Euro-IVET, in which I conducted a stakeholder engagement workshop. In order to gain the stakeholders’ participation, I first had to inform them about the project. To do this, I drafted a one-page description of the project in German and English.
C3.2 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provided two valid examples that demonstrate the ability to draw out, support the verbalization and documentation of knowledge and practice from participants to enable comparison, exchange, peer review, etc
C.3.3. Ability to capture learning for participants to take away: 
As a point of course, I provide participants with all the materials presented at meetings, including slides, handouts, agendas, etc. In addition, if we co-produce material by placing moderation cards in relation to each other or developing knowledge on flipcharts or other handwritten media, I develop a photo protocol which not only records these results but puts them in the context of the discussions that led to their production through additional notes and remarks. I additionally protocol all meetings by taking notes during the meeting and then polishing these before sending them around for feedback and review. Major decisions, agreements, responsibilities and deadlines are clearly highlighted and easily recognizable in the text. I have found that providing a short summary of the key points (agreements, deadlines, responsibilities, next steps) in a box on the first page of the protocol ensures that all partners read and acknowledge this information. In the event of misunderstandings or disagreements, the detailed part of the protocol can be referred to in order to understand the context behind the agreement, deadline, delegation of responsibility, etc.
C3.3 Assessment: 
1: Provided over two examples that demonstrate the ability to capture learning for participants to take away (slides, handouts, agendas, photo protocal, publishing notes, short summary)
C.3.4. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate good practices and policy messages: 
The stakeholder engagement workshop that I describe in C.2.3 yielded not only a 25+ page report which covered stakeholder needs and perspectives and perceived policy considerations in depth, I also synthesized this information into a poster of the key findings (available here: http://euro-ivet.eu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/MetropolisNet-poster.pdf). For the conference “Work 4.0: Made in Berlin,” I chaired the workshop entitled “Urban aspects of work 4.0: Cities as testing grounds for innovation? The example of Berlin.” As moderator, I was responsible not only for ensuring that the four inputs interrelated thematically, but also for guiding the discussion that followed, teasing out five policy recommendations to be discussed in the final plenary, and then writing the documentation for the workshop. In order to ensure that the inputs formed a cohesive narrative, I was in touch with the four speakers well in advance of the event. I developed core questions that I would like to address in the discussion, and requested that they consider these in their inputs. This in-depth preparation allowed clear policy issues and recommendations to be synthesized within a very short period of time (30 minutes of discussion). The summary of the workshop can be found on pages 42 to 47 of the following document: https://www.berlin.de/sen/arbeit/_assets/berlinarbeit-ziel-1/europaeische-beschaeftigungspolitik/ea_konf_eng_dig_20160422_bf.pdf
C3.4 Assessment: 
1: Provided two valid examples that demonstrate the ability to produce concise reports that incorporate good practices and policy messages
Summary Expertise for the design and delivery of transnational exchange and learning activities: 
I have been designing & delivering exchange and learning activities since 2012. I have in-depth experience in meeting design, online collaboration, maintaining structure through the course of long-term projects, and communicating results to a variety of audiences. Through my work as an EU project manager and policy consultant, I have in depth experience in stakeholder engagement, writing local action plans, planning and managing transnational meetings, engaging partners in goal-oriented exchange, & maintaining cooperation and workflows at a distance using various online platforms. Fairness is a critical aspect of cooperation, and ensuring that each partner leaves a meeting with the feeling that he or she was heard and understood is one of the biggest challenges of meeting moderation, especially in the transnational context. I employ a variety of methods in order to engage with different participatory styles and cultures. I frequently use templates to support the standardization of input, but also to help balance out disparities in working cultures and experience levels between partners. Regular reviews of protocols ensure that deadlines get met, and misunderstandings can be easily avoided. I have extensive experience in the communication of complex topics to non-native English speakers, and in the adjustment (at times at short notice) of content, language use, speaking speed, presentation style and/or use of supplementary materials to fit my audience’s needs and background.
Assessment: 
The expert meets the criteria for the expertise for the design and delivery of transnational exchange and learning activities, (C1 3 out of 3, C2 4 out of 4 and C3 3 out of 4) and should therefore be validated for C. The applicant has a solid educational background and she also has working experience, however not for too many years yet. There are no identified inconsistencies between the summary and the replies, nor between the information in the application form and CV.

Thematic expertise:

Theme / Policy: 
Arts and Culture
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
From 2010 until 2013, I completed doctoral research about urban identity and the role of image and discourse in district development. In the dissertation and subsequent articles, I examined the combined role of street names, monuments, architectural style and urban planning measures in the construction of national identity in Berlin, the new/old capital of Germany. I examined how historical structures and ideological posturing during the Cold War influenced which symbols were permitted in Berlin’s urban symbolic landscape, and which were taboo, and how these unspoken rules were linked to Germany’s new political orientation after German reunification. Additionally, in this context I also examined the stigmatization of specific symbols and architectural styles (in particular large-scale slab housing complexes) in both a post-socialist comparative approach (i.e. how socialist symbols and architecture are treated in different national contexts since the cultural turn of 1990), and an international comparative approach (views towards modernist housing complexes and their stigmatization in western and eastern Europe and the USA). My dissertation was published by the university library in July 2014 (http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/dissertationen/dellenbaugh-mary-hartshorn-2013-11-29/METADATA/abstract.php?id=40825). As of October 2016, it has been downloaded more than 2,000 times. I am currently in contractual negotiations with several publishing houses to sell the rights to a general audience adaptation to be released in 2018 in time for the opening of the Humboldt Forum (a historicized reconstruction of the demolished city palace) here in Berlin. I have examined spinoff topics based on my research in several further publications. Topics addressed included how the proliferation of a specific aesthetic ideal and its accompanying worldview shape belonging and participation (https://www.emich.edu/english/jnt/vol44.html), the interdependency of neighbourhood image and that neighbourhood’s development (http://architecturemps.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/mc_conference_dellenbaugh_mary.pdf), and how stigmatization can be linked with historical developments and not the qualities of a neighbourhood or its residents (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262607478_Die_Stigmatisierung_Berlin-Marzahns_als_Ausdruck_kulturelle_Hegemonie_des_Westens_im_vereinten_Deutschland). I teach a course at the Free University which is based on this material (http://www.fu-berlin.de/vv/de/lv/288002?sm=231509) geared towards exchange students visiting Berlin. I have also spoken at a variety of academic and policy conferences about this material, including most notably the Smart Metropolia 2014 policy conference in Gdansk (http://urbnews.pl/smart-metropolia-gdansk-23-24-10-2014/), where I spoke about urban identity and belonging as fundamental aspects of cooperation and solidarity. The knowledge gained in this research has allowed me to present in various contexts about the stigmatization of slab housing (noted here as a project presentation: http://research.uni-leipzig.de/gwzo/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=864&Itemid=1284#). In the policy context, I have offered background insight about the relationship between power, representation and planning doctrine to the Initiative Haus der Statistik (https://hausderstatistik.org/), where I am active in the Akademierat (the advisory council). I have also given invited talks in the context of the initiative’s event series, the Akademie der ZUsammenKUNFT (https://hausderstatistik.org/akademie/). While the research concentrated on national identity, the principles set out in this research can and have been used to work on concepts of inclusion, participation and solidarity of a variety of groups, such as the LGTBI community (cooperation with Byron Lee about queer-friendly neighbourhoods) or refugees (as in my cooperation with the Haus der Statistik).
D1 Assessment: 
1: The applicant demonstrates more than 2 years of experience in having deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc. (e.g. experience deep knowledge: research about urban identity and the role of image and discourse in district development, furthermore she explains very detailed how she keeps up to date, including links etc).
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
I was invited to speak at the policy conference Smart Metropolia 2014, at which I gave an input entitled “But now everywhere is the West: Cultural identity in East Berlin after 1989.” The overarching topic of the conference was urban solidarity. In this context, I postulated that the concepts of identity and belonging are central to solidarity. In my talk and the paper that followed it, I argued that deep rifts in historical and historiographical continuity are leading to a shift from territorial nationalism to new forms of the embodiment of national and in-group identity (for example ethnicity-based right-wing nationalism), a societal trajectory that will continue to grow with further increases in mobility, immigration and digital networking. I have also incorporated these topics into my cooperation with the Initiative Haus der Statistik in Berlin. In supporting the development of a vacant administrative building from the GDR into a centre for art, social activities, and refugee housing, I will give a talk about participation, planning and belonging. In addressing the historical aspects of planning in Berlin, I was able to draw out the policy implications of participation in Berlin’s central district today, and position the planned centre in these discussions (https://hausderstatistik.org/alexanderplatz-identitaet-erinnerung-geschichte-zukunft-teach-in/).
D2 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides two relevant detailed examples that demonstrate her ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which she has been involved.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
The talk about identity and solidarity that I held at Smart Metropolia 2014 yielded a policy paper which was published in Polish in 2015 (available here, p. 21 – 24, in Polish with an English summary: http://docplayer.pl/3763928-Metropolia-solidarnosci.html). This paper adapted the talk that I gave to reflect policy objectives of increased solidarity. Heritage and belonging are fundamental to solidarity – citizens who feel disenfranchised from the city in which they live may also disengage from the social and political spheres. Thus, I argue in the paper, it is critical to include all histories and historiographies in the urban landscape. An article that I wrote during my dissertation had a primarily policy-oriented focus (pp. 106 – 120; http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/dissertationen/dellenbaugh-mary-hartshorn-2013-11-29/METADATA/abstract.php?id=40825), In this paper, I performed a thorough analysis of housing and urban development policy in the two Berlin districts of Friedrichshain (central district with industrial-era tenement housing) and Marzahn (satellite district with large-scale slab housing), and the media resonance and image of these districts in the period directly after the fall of the Berlin Wall. I established two post-reunification urban discourse paradigms “Altbau” (historic, industrial-era buildings and/or districts) and “Platte” (large-scale post-war housing estates) using grounded theory; empirical data sources included interviews, demographic data, legal texts, and scientific literature. I then established that the temporal development of these two discourse paradigms in Berlin can be divided into 4 distinct time periods, each of which was characterized by different key impulses on a national, local and/or demographic level. In the end, through temporal development, I was able to show that present-day discourse paradigms are the cumulative effect of these impulses and not the self-explanatory resumption of an interrupted development path, as mainstream determinative narratives attempt to imply. This information is presented in a way that is accessible to policymakers.
D3 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides two valid examples that demonstrate her ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange and learning activities, put forward good practice and policy messages targeting city practitioners and urban policy-makers (for participants as well as for an external audience).
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
Despite the fact that my work on this topic (i.e. my doctoral research) initially had a purely academic focus, I have been able to incorporate it more and more into policy work by addressing the overarching topics of participation, solidarity and inclusion. Since transitioning into 100% freelance work in June 2016, I have drafted a new exploitation and dissemination plan for the results obtained in the course of my doctoral research, and the insights gained since then. The new dissemination plan for 2017 & 2018 includes blog posts on my existing blog (https://marydellenbaugh.wordpress.com/) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DrMaryDellenbaugh/ for example this post: https://www.facebook.com/DrMaryDellenbaugh/photos/a.1232675543409311.1073741833.1186722231337976/1277577578919107) sites and a new, consolidated release of a reworked version of the dissertation. In preparation for the release of the new book in 2018, I am conducting concentrated and strategic networking at national and international conferences and other events, and preparing for the European Year of Cultural Heritage in 2018.
D4 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides a relevant example that demonstrates her understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for strategic benefits in capitalization, policy design, awareness raising, etc.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
My doctoral research (2010 – 2013) dealt with urban identity and belonging in post-Wall Berlin based on street names, architectural styles, monuments and participation in planning measures. The insights gained in this work have allowed to me address such varied topics as the stigmatization of large-scale slab housing estates, identity in post-socialist cities and belonging as a fundamental prerequisite of solidarity and cooperation. My dissertation was published in 2013. During and since my doctoral research, I have published multiple articles and policy papers and speak regularly about these topics at academic and policy conferences.
Assessment: 
The applicant is validated for D under theme "Arts and Culture" with a score of 4 out of 4. There are no identified inconsistencies between her application form and her CV.
Theme / Policy: 
Integrated Urban Renewal
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
I am a specialist for urban redevelopment through culture, in particular in shrinking & post-industrial urban contexts, a specialization which began during my master in landscape architecture and continued through my doctoral research in human geography. Most recently, I have completed a book entitled Städtewandel durch Kultur (Urban development through culture) which will be published in March 2017. In the book, which was contracted out to me by the Thuringia State Central Office for Political Education, and which is aimed at laypersons, I examine various forms of culture in the urban context and their roles in urban development. The research for this book began in 2014, and covers the theories of Richard Florida & Charles Landry, the European Capital of Culture and other event formats, cultural quarters, flagship projects, the development of the lofts of SoHo and other forms of urban development through culture. In the book, I thoroughly outline the background of the rise of culture as a vehicle for urban development as a result of deindustrialization processes in developed economies in Western Europe and the US, as well as deindustrialization’s role in making the spaces that form the frequent backdrop for urban spatial appropriations by cultural actors available. I link this to the decline of manufacturing and the rise of the service sectors in these economies. Globalization compounded these developments through the increase in digital connectivity and the new global competition between cities for highly-skilled workers, investment funds, and media attention. In the final section of the book, I present four case studies derived from interviews with cultural actors. In the conclusion, I synthesize policy suggestions based on this material. Further publications and work in this vein are already planned, including current work on a research proposal with the Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft and the union ver.di to examine locational factors and housing choice among creative industry workers. The research performed for the book also flows into my work with the Haus der Statistik Initiative, an initiative here in Berlin trying to spearhead the development of a vacant administrative building from the GDR into a centre for art, social activities and refugee housing, where I am an active member of the Akademierat (advisory council). My knowledge about this topic therefore has two main foci: the analysis of urban situations where demographic change is occurring, with concomitant increasing vacancy rates, and developing integrated concepts to address these issues which touch all levels of sustainability under consideration of the current shift to knowledge-based economy and the increasing role of creativity in urban development.
D1 Assessment: 
1: The applicant demonstrates more than 2 years of experience in having deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc. (e.g. publications on the topic and her education, furthermore she explains very detailed how she keeps up to date, including links etc).
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
My monograph on this topic, Städtewandel durch Kultur (Urban Development through Culture), which is short and concise (about 50 A4 pages), and intended for laypersons, deals primarily with the second focus of this thematic expertise, namely the development of integrated solutions to deindustrialization and vacancy. The book is conceived as a general audience text, which is intended to convey the topic to an audience with a wide variety of starting points and perspectives, I have addressed the other focus for example through two further publications. The first example is a book chapter about design in shrinking cities (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262607292_Designing_in_Shrinking_Cities_-_the_case_of_Eastern_Germany), which in particular address the structural transformation in shrinking cities in the former German Democratic Republic directly after German reunification. Many of these cities are continuing to experience negative demographic change and concomitant high vacancy rates and image problems. In addition, the policy-oriented article in my dissertation (pp. 106 – 120; http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/dissertationen/dellenbaugh-mary-hartshorn-2013-11-29/METADATA/abstract.php?id=40825) examined the post-Wall development of two Berlin districts of Friedrichshain (central district with industrial-era tenement housing) and Marzahn (satellite district with large-scale slab housing). The issues that I identified in Marzahn are similar to those in other large-scale slab housing districts, and can be directly transferred.
D2 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides two relevant detailed examples that demonstrate her ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which she has been involved.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
In the final section of the monograph already mentioned above, I present four case studies derived from interviews with cultural actors. The interviews with various types of cultural actors (artists, activists, managers of funding programs for arts, etc.) in different countries were about an hour each. These were recorded, transcribed and then summarized with quotes. The final summaries of these interviews are about two A4 pages each, and detail the perspective of individual actors in creative industries and the arts. I argue that this perspective is critical, as urban planning through culture tends to take a top-down approach (application of creative cities theory (Landry) or creative capital theory (Florida)), without considering the voices of the individual actors who contribute collectively to the image of a city as creative or attractive for creative actors. However, since these groups are often highly mobile, I deliberately incorporate their voices into the process to create a more sustainable and cooperative concept, and one in which creativity, the arts, culture, and creative industries represent a fundamental and long-term aspect of urban growth and prosperity. In my role as consultant for the Europe Agency for the Berlin Senate Department for Labour, Integration and Women’s Issues, I was responsible for writing policy briefs for Senator Dilek Kolat and her employees so that she could prepare herself for meetings with international delegations (research and of labour market policy from other countries, then concisely summarizing the most important points), but also for gathering information for the senator and various departmental employees in preparation for various events and conferences. In this function, I also led workshops during conferences hosted by the senate department (for example here, pp. 42 – 47: https://www.berlin.de/sen/arbeit/_assets/berlinarbeit-ziel-1/europaeische-beschaeftigungspolitik/ea_konf_eng_dig_20160422_bf.pdf). This example addressed large cities as the ideal locations for innovation, in this case digitalization. Many of the same principles that apply to culture also apply to other forms of creativity, such as the start-ups that spoke in the panel. According to Richard Florida’s creative capital theory, technology is one of the “three Ts” necessary for attracting creative workers, but creativity from a strong arts and culture scene can also provide the soft, quality-of-life factors that attract highly skilled workers, who then go on to tap their own creativity in creating new forms of digital industries, starting new businesses, or finding new ways to create value from existing structures.
D3 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides two valid examples that demonstrate her ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange and learning activities, put forward good practice and policy messages targeting city practitioners and urban policy-makers (for participants as well as for an external audience).
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
I developed a dissemination plan for the forthcoming book which involves several steps. First, since the book is in German, I have been concentrating on national congresses and conferences (Baukultur Kongress, Bundeskongress für nationale Stadtentwicklung, etc.) in order to develop a mailing list of recipients of copies of the book after its publication. This list now includes policy makers in cities of various sizes, contacts in the federal building ministry, and numerous cultural actors in Berlin. Promotion does or will include blog posts on my existing blog (https://marydellenbaugh.wordpress.com/) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DrMaryDellenbaugh/ for example this post: https://www.facebook.com/DrMaryDellenbaugh/posts/1314059281937603) sites. In order to reach a wider audience, an English-language version of this publication in cooperation with the Robert Bosch Stiftung is planned. Additionally, as soon as the manuscript has been submitted to the publishing house (deadline: 1 December), I will draft an executive summary of the book in German and English which will be posted to my website and crosslinked in Facebook. I will be able to disseminate and exploit this even further by activating the strong partners in my network, and through the continuation of my active contribution to and cooperation with the Akademie der Zusammenkunft (https://hausderstatistik.org/akademie/).
D4 Assessment: 
1: The applicant provides a relevant example that demonstrates her understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for strategic benefits in capitalization, policy design, awareness raising, etc.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
I have years of expertise in the analysis of urban shrinkage, deindustrialization and structural change and in the development of integrated concepts to address these issues which touch all levels of sustainability under consideration of the current shift to knowledge-based economy and the increasing role of creativity in urban development. I stress the needs to address the perspective of cultural actors more fully, a topic which I have addressed in detail in my forthcoming book about urban development through culture. These groups are often highly mobile, therefore the deliberate incorporation of their voices into the process can help create a more sustainable and cooperative development concept, and one in which creativity, the arts, culture and creative industries represent a fundamental and long-term aspect of urban growth and prosperity, instead of a short term planning goal. I am the author of not only that monograph, but also multiple policy-oriented publications analysing the structural change which attends deindustrialization (rising vacancy rates, increasing median age, lower birth rates, negative demographic development, etc.). I have addressed these and other topics in my work as a policy consultant for European labour market policy for the Berlin Senate Department for Labour, Integration and Women’s Issues, and in my active contribution to and cooperation with the Akademie der Zusammenkunft (https://hausderstatistik.org/akademie/).
Assessment: 
The applicant is validated for D under theme "Integrated Urban Renewal" with a score of 4 out of 4. There are no identified inconsistencies between her application form and her CV.
Theme / Policy: 
Integrated Urban Renewal
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
I have been researching and working with the topic of urban commons since 2012, when I co-founded the Urban Research Group, a self-organized group of postdoctoral researchers, at the Georg Simmel Centre for Metropolitan Research. Together with the other 4 members, I organized the conference “Urban Commons: Moving beyond State and Market,” which took place in September of 2013. Over the course of the next 2 years, we engaged in intense reading, research and exchange with each other and the conference participants selected to publish their work in a collected volume of the same title (https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/430778). As a group, we collectively researched and wrote a meta-analysis of commons theory and its relation to the urban which consequently became the introductory chapter to the collected work. Since then, I have spoken at numerous workshops, given invited talks and presented at policy conferences (i.e. Urban School Ruhr: http://www.urbanschoolruhr.org/en/post/commons-zum-anfassen/; MakeCity festival (my input is at 2:00): http://makecity.berlin/festival-documentary/?lang=en; Akademie der Zusammenkunft: https://hausderstatistik.org/workshop-zu-urban-commons-in-berlin/). I was also on the international scientific committee for the IASC conference about urban commons (http://urbancommons.labgov.it/) and the international scientific committee for the project INDIGO (http://theindigoproject.be/partners/). I have been integral in the planning of our follow-up event series (http://urbanresearchgroup.blogspot.de/p/urban-commons.html), where, instead of hosting an event myself, I have chosen to take responsibility for dissemination and exploitation, and I am currently formulating a policy-oriented publication for a wider audience to address challenges and special characteristics of urban commons, tentatively entitled “The Urban Commons Cookbook.”
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
I have presented about the urban commons in various different contexts, from the Berlin architecture biennale (at 2:00: http://makecity.berlin/festival-documentary/?lang=en) to an alternative learning space (Urban School Ruhr: http://www.urbanschoolruhr.org/en/post/commons-zum-anfassen/) to a policy workshop (Akademie der Zusammenkunft: https://hausderstatistik.org/workshop-zu-urban-commons-in-berlin/; https://www.flickr.com/photos/raumforschung/sets/72157675677424396). For each of these settings, I was required to develop a presentation appropriate for my audience, and in two cases the slides were accompanied by a handout. The handout included the salient points of the meta-analysis that we performed for our book, plus relevant points specific to the audience and setting.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
At the policy workshop mentioned above (https://hausderstatistik.org/workshop-zu-urban-commons-in-berlin/), I led a world café table dealing with the question of property rights and the possibility that commons could form a new “third way.” I was responsible for guiding the discussion process and then extracting and presenting the results of the discussion, which will feed into a larger publication about commons-related policy. In June 2015, I gave a presentation to a group of participants from NGOs and urban planning professions in the context of the expert excursion “Participatory Urban Development in International Dialogue” at the Heinrich Böll Foundation (more about the event here: https://ge.boell.org/en/2015/08/12/make-city-festival-report-participation). I prepared a presentation with copious notes, which I then distributed as a handout.
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
I took part in designing the initial dissemination plan for our book, which involved a public relations plan to make the most out of the concurrent architecture biennial in Berlin. In this context, members of the collective spoke at the Technical University, the MakeCity Festival, the Heinrich Böll Foundation, and at a formal book launch at the well-known local bookshop Bücherbogen. I personally spoke at three of these events. I have been responsible for an extended dissemination plan for the book associated with the development of a new series of events addressing new aspects of urban commons (http://urbanresearchgroup.blogspot.de/p/urban-commons.html). I have developed a dissemination strategy involving press releases and announcements to relevant mailing lists and newsletters, a group Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/urbanresearchgroup) with event announcements, targeted networking with and through strong partners, stakeholders in this field and their networks, and a planned additional policy-oriented publication. I am 100% responsible for generating content and event posts on our Facebook page (for example this post: https://www.facebook.com/urbanresearchgroup/posts/1399355843409664) Additionally, we gift the book to strong partners & cooperation partners who are key multipliers in discussions about urban commons, including the commons network, the Mietshäuser Syndikat, the IASC, the Montag Foundation, etc.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
I have been researching and working with the topic of urban commons since 2012, when I co-founded the Urban Research Group, a self-organized group of postdoctoral researchers, at the Georg Simmel Centre for Metropolitan Research. Together with the other four members, I organized the conference “Urban Commons: Moving beyond State and Market,” which took place in September of 2013. Over the course of the next 2 years, we engaged in intense reading, research and exchange with each other and the conference participants selected to publish their work in a collected volume of the same title (https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/430778). As a group, we collectively researched and wrote a meta-analysis of commons theory and its relation to the urban which consequently became the introductory chapter to the collected work. Since then, I have spoken at numerous workshops, given invited talks and presented at policy conferences. I was also on the international scientific committee for the IASC conference about urban commons and the international scientific committee for the project INDIGO. I have been integral in the planning of our follow-up event series, where, instead of hosting an event myself, I have chosen to take responsibility for dissemination and exploitation, and I am currently formulating a policy-oriented publication for a wider audience to address challenges and special characteristics of urban commons, tentatively entitled “The Urban Commons Cookbook.”
Assessment: 
Please note that the applicant applied twice for Integrated Urban Renewal.

Informations

Residence location:
Germany
Languages:
English - Mother tongue
Foreign Languages level: 
Foreign languages: 
,
Foreign Languages level: 
Foreign languages: 
Email:
m.dellenbaugh@gmail.com
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Area of expertise