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Solin

Solin

The small city of Solin (18 km2) is part of the city of Split’s functional urban area. The city of Split is the second largest city in Croatia with a population of 178 102 (2011). Over the past twenty years, there has been a population decrease within the city centre and a population increase in the surrounding region. Solin’s residents are among the youngest in Croatia, due to cheaper housing, good transportation facilities and the vicinity of Split. Solin has doubled its population since 1971, and between 2001 and 2011, the population grew by 21%. Solin expects to have more than 30 000 inhabitants by 2030. This rapid population growth has stimulated building activities, some illegal and unplanned, and mainly housing. Solin wants to stop the urban sprawl from devouring the landscape – Solin’s most precious resource are the ruins of the old Roman capital of Dalmatia, Salona. Some city districts include no public space at all, thus decreasing the quality of life, social interaction and cohesion, and causing local residents to search for leisure and cultural activities outside of the city boundaries.

Solin is a growing city in terms of population and land use. The city is faced with population pressure, especially from young families. It is a reflection of the situation in the entire agglomeration of Split, which Solin is a part of.

Housing is cheaper and therefore more appealing than in the agglomeration centre and neighbouring city of Split. This has been a long-term trend. The majority of private housing, which is predominant in Solin, was built illegally. A legalisation process was initiated under the government campaign over the last two years.

Some parts of the city are extremely dense while others are not, mainly for four reasons: (1) the vast archaeological site of Roman Salona (historic city centre) is not a building zone, (2) there are hectares of protected green belts in the city outskirts, (3) distant areas are less appealing for housing purposes because of the poor transportation infrastructure, and (4) there are huge industrial and brownfield areas in need of reconversion. Highly aware that the options for further sustainable urban development are limited due to administrative and natural restrictions, the city of Solin is grasping at the chance to change the physical, social and economic trends in the city in order to put a halt to the urban sprawl. This is also an opportunity to work on defining the identity of the small city within the bigger functional area.

SOME RELATED NETWORKS

sub>urban

sub>urban. Reinventing the fringe
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