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Schlappa

Hans

Schlappa

Validated Lead Expert

Generic Skills

B.1. Understanding of integrated and sustainable urban development: 
I have twenty years practical experience of developing, implementing and evaluating urban regeneration initiatives. Working for social enterprises and municipalities I was responsible for governmental and EU funded social inclusion, economic development, environmental improvement and community safety initiatives delivered through partnerships between public, voluntary and private sector organisations. Since 2004 I am working in the higher education sector, managing and teaching on executive development programmes for public and voluntary sector organisations. I have managed a self-funded research institute concerned with social enterprise and civil society organisations and undertaken a wide range of national as well as European studies on issues ranging from active ageing to the socio-economic integration of young people and refugees. I have been Lead Expert for two URBACT networks that dealt with integrated urban development (REGENERA 2004 – 2007; SURE 2009 – 2013), I was Lead Expert for the URBACT pilot project on good practice transfer (Placemaking for Cities, 2014 – 2015) and also led the URBACT capitalization project on shrinking cities and demographic change (2012- 2013).
B.2. Understanding of exchange and learning processes at transnational level: 
Transnational networks I have been lead expert for typically involved mayors, elected politicians, departmental directors and middle managers of municipalities as well as volunteers and managers of civils society organisations. Supporting learning and exchange between these different actors is challenging within the context of a single country, these challenges are multiplied in transnational settings. Developing the capacity for constructive yet critical debate about different approaches to and perspectives on urban development problems is therefore a core goal for the networks I am responsible for. Engaging partners in practical exchanges with their peers to review and develop their ideas on tackling complex problems tends to be at the center of the exchange and learning activities of the networks I am leading. Supporting participants in reflecting on their own practice and providing the group with higher level conceptual models that help them make sense of the challenges others encounter and why they respond to them in their particular way, are among the most important contributions which I make alongside the thematic and methodological inputs I make.
B.3. Proficiency in English: 
I have worked in the UK for 30 years and am an accomplished presenter, able to communicate effectively with professional, political, community and academic audiences. I have published extensively in policy, practitioner and peer reviewed journals. There are several articles in the URBACT Tribune I co-authored with other urban development experts and I have written a wide range of reports on the results of the URBACT networks I have led.

Expertise for the design and delivery of transnational exchange and learning activities:

C.3.1. Ability to communicate complex concepts to non-English speakers: 
Speaking slowly, clearly and avoiding technical terms as well as acronyms provides the basis for facilitating meetings where English is not the first language of participants. Using videos, especially amateur ones, has proved problematic because presenters often speak too fast or have strong regional accents which makes translation and/or understanding difficult. I often use images to illustrate the nature of problems or their solution, drawing on examples from partners where possible and appropriate. I also prepare role play to exemplify, for example, different perceptions of the same problem, and then follow this with small group exercises to consider a particular problem from different perspectives. Group composition is sensitive to language abilities and cultural differences as well as expertise and roles partners perform in their cities. I ensure that as many individuals as possible contribute during the day, encouraging the use of online formats such as prezzi, as well as whiteboards and flip charts to use images, diagrams and simple words to illustrate their points. Powerpoint has proved an effective platform where participants can share and contribute to presentations. In my presentations I use little text, simple words and where possible diagrams to convey concepts. I have made podcasts to capture results from discussions or to explain ideas, such as community engagement, but find that non-English speakers also need written material to engage with complex concepts.
C.3.2. Ability to draw out, support the verbalization and documentation of knowledge and practice from participants: 
Network meetings and workshops are interactive situations in which participants do most of the talking. I design seminars in such a way that a presentation does not last for more than 30 minutes and is followed, where possible, by practical activities where participants are asked to reflect on, apply or critique what they have heard. This can be in form of round table discussions, based on the rule that everybody has to make one comment and ask one question, for example, or work in groups composed of participants according to task requirements. For example, some tasks require teams from the same city to work together while others require a mix of partners. Participants share insights and critical arguments with the whole group while I make notes and summarise key points at the end of a session. Within a few days I produce a draft note of the meeting for comment by participants before finalizing it. In the good practice transfer project Placemaking for Cities I produced a learning log after each knowledge exchange visit. This was based on the peer review discussions and a reflection by the hosting partner city about what they wanted to do differently as a result of the meeting. Here both LE and partner city co-produced a critical record of the learning that had taken place. Learning logs were posted on the project website and provided the framework for local actions to transfer practices.
C.3.3. Ability to capture learning for participants to take away: 
Summarising and abstracting key points to higher level concepts that all partners can relate to is essential during the meeting and needs to be captured in written form afterwards. Where specific practices are concerned these can be presented in template format, listing problem the intervention addressed, methods used, costs, time, challenges encountered and so forth. One way of making participants themselves capture practices they want to apply in their home city is to design a session towards the end of an exchange visit where city representatives work in their city group to identify what practices they would like to adopt and what barriers and opportunities to transfer they see (I did this in SURE as well as Placemaking for Cities). Then each group shares the results of their discussion; the hosting city is the discussant, asking and responding to questions while I facilitate proceeding to ensure that each city has sufficient time to explore their ideas. In this way participants take away a wealth of their own ideas, my record of the discussion then becomes an aide memoir which we can return to at the following exchange meeting, either as the basis for an online discussion/webinar or the next exchange visit. The learning logs from the Plaemaking fro Cities network provide good examples of how peer learning can be captured.
C.3.4. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate good practices and policy messages: 
I have produced a wide range of reports and publications for URBACT, including Tribune articles, baseline studies, position papers, briefing notes, conceptual papers as well as baseline studies, interim and final reports. These are readily available on the URBACT webpages for SURE, Placemaking for Cities and the capitalization reports ‘Cities of Tomorrow, Action Today’. In addition I have produced research and consulting reports for municipal and governmental organisations, including good practice guides and policy advice.
Summary Expertise for the design and delivery of transnational exchange and learning activities: 
An experienced leader of EU networks and capitalization initiatives I have extensive experience in designing the exchange of knowledge using interactive learning techniques that foster the inclusion and active participation partners whose first language is not English. A skilled facilitator I draw on my extensive teaching and consulting experience when responding to different learning styles and cultural as well as sectoral differences. Using a range of techniques to animate meetings and workshops I ensure that the voice of all participants is heard, including those often on the margins of exchange meetings, such as members of civil society organisations. I have substantial experience in publishing urban renewal related findings and practices in magazines, peer reviewed journals, books and news media.

Thematic expertise:

Theme / Policy: 
Integrated Urban Renewal
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
I have twenty years practical experience of leading partnerships of public, private and not-for-profit organisations in the development and delivery of integrated urban renewal strategies. I have been responsible for ERDF, ESF and governmental resources to tackle social exclusion, crime and disorder, environmental degradation and economic decline in large and small local authorities in England. My educational background includes a PhD on the role of civil society organisations to the delivery of URBAN II initiatives in Berlin, Belfast and Bristol, which I obtained in 2010 from Aston Business School. I have undertaken research and published on integrated urban renewal in regard to collaborative practice to tackle long term decline.
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
I have substantial experience of producing reports at national and local level on key issues in regeneration policy and practice that were published and shared with politicians, citizens, civil society organisations and businesses. At transnational level I have provided thematic inputs on the engagement of local communities as one of three thematic experts responsible for leading the URBACT I funded REGENERA Project from 2004 – 2007 by issuing conceptual papers, preparing workshops and providing presentations which summarise and contextualize key issues from contemporary practice in Europe. Designing and leading the URBACT II funded SURE project from 2009 – 2013 allowed me to make many thematic inputs on integrated urban renewal starting with framing the socio-economic issues partner cities encountered in the baseline study, to identifying potential practices that would encourage critical reflection and also innovations based on the adoption and adaptation of practices from partner cities.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
In regard to integrated urban renewal I co-authored the final report for the REGERA project, with my main contribution being the identification of effective practices in regard to community engagement and partnership working with civil society organisations. I produced the interim outputs and report for the SURE project which explicitly addressed integrated approaches to urban renewal. These provided the framework and basis for the Local Action Plans and other outputs such as maps, photos, videos and printed material, such as posters and information leaflets produced by SURE partners.
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
The dissemination of outputs from the REGENRA project was limited to the production of reports and a final conference, both of which did not reach beyond officials closely involved with the project. The SURE project demonstrated a wider reach, where I encouraged and frequently participated in local radio and television interviews intended to reach a wide local audience and to engender the participation of local stakeholders. Partners produced press releases, leaflets and also videos featuring citizens who explained their participation and the benefits expected from the integrated strategy that were being developed for their neighbourhood. Each partner was encouraged to run a local workshop/mini conference to share results and invite comment as well as participation in regard to proposed actions. Encouraging and enabling local partners to continue with an information and engagement strategy that reached different agencies as well as communities was one of my key tasks during the final stages of the SURE project. In the Placemaking for Cities project a central element was the animation of public spaces, using engagement techniques adapted from partner cities. Twitter and Pintrest alongside television and radio were used to engage a wide audience.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
I have extensive practical and theoretical knowledge of integrated urban renewal, local governance, environmental management and the active engagement of local communities. My expertise is rooted in 20 years of managing urban regeneration projects for public and not-for-profit organisations as well as 12 years as a researcher and teacher in higher education institutions. My international expertise includes participation in a wide range of European research and consulting projects, such as leading the URBACT funded REGENERA and SURE projects, both of which were explicitly concerned with integrated urban renewal.
Theme / Policy: 
Local Governance
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
Governance is concerned with the way political, regulatory, institutional and societal process are managed to achieve particular outcomes. I obtained my MSc in Public Services Management with distinction in 2001 and since then have taught on topics such as public leadership, strategic management and public governance in different universities. As programme director for the post graduate masters degree in Leadership and Management in Public Services I ensure that we approach issues of governance and leadership from a range of different perspectives, including policy, performance management and strategy. The key transnational initiative concerned with urban governance that I have led was the URBACT sponsored capitalisation on urban shrinkage and demographic change 2012-2013: From Crisis to Choice – Reimagining the future of shrinking cities. This project was based on assembling a panel of experts and then collecting evidence through ‘hearings’ from practitioners on their practices to tackle shrinkage and demographic change. We explored how successfully tackling long term urban decline requires sharing of leadership roles between public, business and civil society leaders. Traditional hierarchical approaches to governance need to give way to networks and collaborative approaches where co-ordination and facilitation, rather than control, are key methods to bring about change.
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
During the URBACT sponsored capitalization project on shrinking cities and demographic change I designed the methodological framework for and chaired three expert witness hearings in three different countries. In preparation for each session I provided the expert panel with a brief of the particular topic/problem constellation we were going to investigate and then identified collectively suitable witnesses to invite. For the actual hearings I provided briefings on the expertise of invited experts, including topic related briefings to frame each session in regard to how specific shrinkage problems such as stagnant land markets, oversized urban service infrastructure, economic decline and ageing populations were to be addressed in the context of wider governance issues. I maintained in contact with expert witnesses after the sessions, encouraging their input in the final capitalization report.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
My report on shrinking cities and demographic change for the URBACT capitalization project ‘Cities of Tomorrow, Action Today’ informed four conference papers to share lessons from practice with policy, practitioner and academic audiences. An article in the URBACT Tribune shared emerging findings from the capitalisation work. In 2016 I published a book on shrinking cities in the Royal Town Planning Institute Library Series which aims at urban development experts as well as academics. The book brings together scholars and practitioners in sharing cutting edge knowledge on dealing with the complexity of urban shrinkage. Topics addressed range from policy and urban governance to very specific practical actions on infrastructure, open spaces, housing, the social economy, strategy, leadership and more: Schlappa & Neill (2016) Future Directions for the European Shrinking City, Routledge. One of my articles that was published in a peer reviewed academic journal in 2017 draws on the experience and learning from the URBACT capitalization project and relating this to contemporary European Union policy: Co-producing the cities of tomorrow – Fostering collaborative action to tackle decline in Europe’s shrinking cities, European Urban and Regional Studies, vol24, issue 2, April 2017.
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
The different outputs generated by my work on shrinking cities are set out above. Although difficult to measure, there will have been significant impact in terms of helping to make urban shrinkage a key issue for national and European policy. In addition to publishing written material I presented the findings at European level conferences for practitioners and policy makers. This included an event where I organized a seminar in which leaders of municipalities and expert witnesses illustrated how governance and strategic policy challenges played out in their locality. I then facilitated delegates to work in groups to first reflect on the particular challenges they faced in their cities and then consider whether some of the suggestions put forward by presenters might be applied in their locality. Some of panel members and expert witnesses later contributed to the book on shrinking cities which I edited.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
I have substantial expertise in conceptualising and exploring the nature and challenges associated with governing organisations, networks and cities, with a specific focus on collaborative strategy and leadership in regeneration practice. My transnational experience includes developing integrated urban regeneration strategies with cities in the URBACT funded REGENERA and SURE networks and also the URBACT funded capitalisation exploring the challenges associated with governing cities which encounter long term decline.
Theme / Policy: 
Environmental Issues
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
I took my first degree in landscape and urban planning at the Technische Universität Berlin. I maintain relationships with a number of universities in Europe on urban planning and environmental management topics, in particular with the Technische Hochschule in Dresden. In addition to my studies and current academic work I have 10 years work experience in not-for-profit organsaitions, Groundwork in particular, where was responsible for developing partnerships for sustainable urban and environmental development. I also have several years experience of managing projects concerned with derelict land while in local authority employment. My expertise includes strategic open space planning, land assembly for green infrastructure, countryside management, open spaces on housing estates, community involvement in designing, building and managing green open spaces in urban areas. I was Lead Expert for the URBACT II sponsored Placemaking 4 Cities project which was primarily concerned with enhancing and animating open spaces in cities, but the SURE project also had a strong environmental emphasis as part of the integrated renewal strategies partners were pursuing. Recently I arranged and published on a collaboration with the University of Dresden on the topic of green infrastructure in declining regions.
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
I have substantial practical experience in both planning and implementing environmental improvement schemes led by civil society organisations as well as municipalities. I have led on consultation and planning processes, such as planning for real or Charette events, to improve urban open spaces, ranging from strategic urban forestry projects to the integration of nature conservation measure in new housing schemes. The Placemaking 4 Cities project emerged from the earlier SURE project I had been lead expert for and I could draw on detailed knowledge of participating cities to provide tailored inputs on the principles and practice of community participation, for example conceptualising placemaking practice as an approach to community empowerment in urban renewal, which was directly relevant to all participating cities. A key innovation I made was the introduction of a critical peer review process to explore the extent to which practices from one city might be transferred to another. During the peer review I played the role of ‘critical friend’, casting the practitioners from partner cities as the experts on their particular placemaking practices. This process proved highly effective in generating critical reflection and assessment as to the transferability of practices that were being explored. This process put an emphasis on the expertise practitioners brought to the learning process.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
I drafted the baseline study for Placemaking for Cities and developed the methodological framework for the transfer of good practice, including practical actions in each city to demonstrate their ability to adapt practices to local circumstances. The URBACT webpage for this project contains a range of short reports capturing the learning partners were engaged in, such as the ‘learning logs’. I created these ‘learning logs’ to capture the reasons for and barriers to the adoption and adaptation of practices from other cities to local contexts.
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
Using Twitter and Pintrest, Placemaking for Cities quickly attracted hundreds of followers. To this day some members of the Placemaking for Cities partnership work with the networks that were established during the network exchanges (see for example the URBACT III City Centre Doctor network). Dissemination strategies included local TV and radio, posters as well as printed and electronic written information. The final conference in Dublin was very well attended by policy makers and practitioners and organized in ways which gave policy makers and practitioners opportunity for critical debate and which encouraged critical reflection on their own established practices.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
I have extensive practical experience of developing environmental improvement projects both at community and strategic level, ranging from locally controlled community gardens to regionally significant urban forestry initiatives. Enabling citizens to shape and contribute to the governance and implementation of environmental improvement initiatives is essential in my view. The Placemaking for Cities project is an example where the focus was on animating spaces rather than undertaking physical improvements to enhance the urban environment. Current research interests include the development of green infrastructure in declining regions and cities.
Theme / Policy: 
Active Inclusion of Target Groups
D.1. Deep knowledge on the selected theme and related policy challenges, including up to date practice, research, etc.: 
While managing the Institute for Voluntary Sector Research I undertook a wide range of studies which were focused on societal groups that were disadvantaged or excluded in some way, for example unemployed young people, ex-offenders, travelers, black and minority ethnic communities and so forth. During my practice as regeneration manager I worked extensively with such communities, developing social inclusion and economic development projects in deprived, multi-cultural neighbourhoods. At European level I have undertaken a number of projects aimed at supporting the integration of minority or disadvantaged groups. This included an EQUAL funded project on the integration of asylum seekers and refugees where I developed the methodological framework and qualitative performance indicators for voluntary and public service organisations to assess current practices of integrating these groups into local communities. I also undertook URBACT funded consulting assignments in Sweden and Hungary concerned with the integration of young people and Roma communities, as well as contributions to transnational capitalization projects concerned with older people, such as the INTERREG IVC initiative on demographic change.
D.2. Ability to produce thematic inputs to feed in the learning process of in projects in which you have been involved: 
For my consulting assignments in Boros and Miskolcz I worked with officials and community representatives to identify the underlying causes associated with the marginalization of young people in Boros and the integration of Roma communities in Miskolcz. I evaluated local practices in relation to contemporary approaches in Europe, creating several opportunities to discuss opportunities for their adoption to local circumstances. My feedback to municipalities was structured in form of a round table discussion of emerging findings, giving participants the opportunity to critique and reflect on issues I had identified prior to the finalisation and publication of the report. This was very different to providing inputs into URBACT networks, such as Placemaking for Cities, which also targeted the inclusion of specific groups, but here I was able to design a methodological framework which enabled partners to practice the inclusion of marginalized communities using new approaches that were being explored during the exchanges.
D.3. Ability to produce concise reports that incorporate learning from exchange & learning activities, put forward good practice: 
All my reports are as concise as possible due to clients requiring clear and accessible materials which can be shared in the public domain. Reports for clients whose first language is not English are written deliberately with a minimum of technical terms, avoiding acronyms and overly long or complex sentences but including pictures and diagrams to illustrate and evidence complex points. Some of the reports on social inclusion Boros and Miscolz are still on the URBACT webpages.
D.4. Understanding of how to maximize the use of project results for benefits in capitalization, policy design, awarenes: 
Many of my reports concerned with the integration of marginalized groups are of a sensitive nature and their promotion or sharing on public platforms is for clients to take responsibility for. The results of the EQUAL funded ASPIRE project, on the other hand, were promoted very widely, with a high profile conference in Birmingham and each partner producing a range of electronic, printed and other outputs, such as music and documentary video as well as filmed role play to illustrate the challenges refugees and asylum seekers encountered. Other projects I led generated a high profile impact, in particular the Placemaking for Cities project, where at transnational and local levels social media and also television and radio were used to engage with stakeholders from a wide range of backgrounds.
Summary Thematic expertise: 
I have extensive expertise in identifying and including marginalised groups in problem analysis, planning and implementation or urban renewal initiatives. I have 20 years of practical experience in designing and running community engagement initiatives, particularly for marginalized and excluded groups, such as black and ethnic minorities, young people, ex-offenders but also older people excluded from community life. At transnational level I designed and led the URBACT II SURE project which placed explicit emphasis on the inclusion of residents. I also designed and led one of the first URBACT knowledge transfer projects concerned with placemaking, a practice which entirely depends on the active participation of residents in the animation of urban spaces. Reaching traders as well as older people was integral to the development of inclusive and hence sustainable interventions.

Expertise support to local authorities and other stakeholders in designing & delivering integrated and participatory policies

E.1. Knowledge on participatory methods and tools for co-production and implementation of local polices : 
As regeneration practitioner I have been extensively involved in designing and running community engagement initiatives, particularly for marginalized and excluded groups, such as black and ethnic minorities, young people, ex-offenders but also older people excluded from community life. At transnational level I designed and led the URBACT II SURE project which placed explicit emphasis on the inclusion of residents. I established the principle that participating municipalities should provide for two representatives of the local action group to participate in exchanges. Where partners embraced the inclusion of their residents in trans-national exchange they found that capacity to progress local action plans was enhanced, not only in terms of comprehension and awareness of the availability of different ways to approach problems, but also in terms of recruitment. Residents are the most effective recruiters to civil society groups involved in integrated regeneration initiatives. The practices explored in the SURE project were successfully applied in Eger, Hungary, where the municipality was able to engage marginalized Roma community in managing a community center, organize clean ups and tree planting as well as developing social enterprises. This principle was further developed in the URBACT funded knowledge transfer project Placemaking 4 Cities which enabled shop owners, residents and parents to actively plan and implement he animation of public spaces.
E.2. Knowledge on integrated approach for the design, delivering, monitoring and evaluation of urban strategies/policies: 
I have been responsible for a number of integrated regeneration initiatives where jobs, safety, the environment and social welfare formed key themes that requires careful monitoring and evaluation. In terms of transnational networks I have been responsible for supporting municipalities in developing their local actions plans. These reflected local circumstances and progressed at different speeds. Some municipalities focused on securing contributions from external agencies (public, private or arms-length companies and civil society organisations) while others placed more emphasis on bottom-up initiatives with the aim to handing over control as well as responsibility for outcomes to local communities. This required different approaches towards capturing and evaluating progress. Practical examples from my URBACT networks include the self-managed community garden in Dun Laoghaire, Ireland (Placemaking for Cities) or the use of mobile street furniture in an experiment to explore animation options for a central square in Louvain la Neuve, Belgium (SURE). I have extensive programme management experience, including responsibility for substantial budgets and the delivery of demanding targets. I am well aware of the shortcomings associated with a focus on budgetary and quantifiable outputs and try to ensure that qualitative evidence of outcomes, interviews with participants or videos for example, is collected in a transparent and rigorous manner.
E.3. Awareness of the main policy and funding schemes for sustainable urban development at EU and national level: 
I have worked with a range of EU funding programmes and also evaluated some of them, such as URBAN and ERDF from academic perspectives. I am linked to a number of networks that utilize EU funding extensively, for example Urban Europe, Regional Studies Association or the Shrinking Cities Network, and I also receive regular updates via the my university’s European funding team, although here funding opportunities tend to be focused on research, but not exclusively. My experience shows that partners tend to be very alert to EU funding opportunities, however, and I explore with them first what their understanding of the local funding regime is before making my own suggestions. However, the local action plans from the SURE project provided the basis of a number of successful bids for EU funding, including those from Larnaca (Cyprus), Eger (Hungary) and Gheorgheni (Romania)
E.4. Ability to understand specific local situations and adapt tools and content to different local realities: 
Engaging local officials and residents is highly context specific and I have experienced the tensions arising from requirements imposed by funders to take a systematic approach while needing to be responsive to local circumstances. The ‘community university’ is an example of a participatory approach I used as part of the Place making 4 Cities project. The principle is based on sharing feedback from visiting cities on the ideas from the host city in regard to improving and animating local spaces. This approach is premised on the notion that placemaking requires the active collaboration of residents and officials to be sustainable, hence the community university is a learning opportunity for officials and residents at the same time. This approach works very well in localities with a strong history of participative democracy, such as Ireland, while in countries such as Hungary, these methods are more difficult to apply. Hence a variant of the community university was applied with the Hungarian partner allowing for the traditional hierarchical relationships between officials and residents to be reflected in the way options for adapting established local practices were framed.
Summary Expertise: 
I have extensive practical and theoretical knowledge of integrated urban renewal, local governance, environmental management and the active engagement of local communities. My expertise is rooted in 20 years of managing urban regeneration projects for public and not-for-profit organisations as well as 12 years of working as a researcher and teacher in higher education institutions. My international expertise includes participation in a wide range of European research and consulting projects. Of direct relevance to URBACT is my expertise in developing and managing the REGENERA and SURE networks which were explicitly concerned with integrated urban renewal. Equally relevant is my expertise in establishing and managing the expert panel on shrinking cities and demographic change which was part of the URBACT capitalization ‘Cities of Tomorrow, Action Today’. My experience of developing and managing one of the first URBACT pilot projects on the transfer of good practices in 2014-2015 enabled me to develop expertise not only on methodological frameworks that facilitate peer learning, but also on methods that enable participants to practice the adoption and adaptation of good practices in their home towns.

Informations

Residence location:
United Kingdom
Languages:
German - Mother tongue
Foreign Languages level: 
Foreign languages: 
Email:
h.schlappa@herts.ac.uk
Unavailable - already performing the role of Lead Expert for an URBACT network

Area of expertise