• URBinclusion

    Timeline

    Kick-off meeting at Paris URBACT secretariat (Phase I)
    Thematic Seminar in February (Trikala), Transnational Meeting and Final Conference “Networking for social inclusion in Europe” in March (Barcelona), URBinclusion Manifesto, partners Operational Implementation Frameworks (OIF), Partners Solution Stories
    Transnational Meeting in February (Barcelona), Project Phase I closure, Project Phase II launch, Transnational Meeting in September (Copenhagen - Kick-off meeting Phase II)
    Thematic Seminar in January (Lyon), June (Glasgow), December (Naples), Transnational Meeting in April (Krakow), October (Turin), URBinclusion partners Implementation Plans

    Arwen Dewilde
    City of Ghent

    CONTACT US

    AYUNTAMIENTO DE BAENA

    Plaza de la Constitucion 1

    Baena (Cordoba) - Spain

    CONTACT US

    Artur Katai
    City of Újbuda

    CONTACT US

    Barcelona City Council - Social Rights Area

    Lluis Torrens: ltorrens@bcn.cat

    Sebastià Riutort: sriutort@ext.bcn.cat

    Socioeconomic disparities and other forms of inequalities are a major issue in European cities which are threatened by social polarisation increase. Poverty does not only create social differences between people and groups; it also leads to spatial differences.
    URBinclusion implementation network focused on the co-creation of new solutions to reduce poverty in deprived urban areas, focusing on some key challenges to be tackled when going from the strategic to the implementation dimension: integrated approach and inter-departmental coordination, involvement of local stakeholders, monitoring and evaluation and financial innovation.
    Partners cities interchange showed that this requires integrated, cyclical and monitored processes made of recursive actions and feedbacks that produces stable conditions of engagement for continuous improvement.

    Combating poverty in deprived urban areas
    Ref nid
    8718
  • INT-HERIT

    https://twitter.com/INTHERIT2017
    https://www.facebook.com/Int-Herit-138269500020260/

    Timeline

    Project Launch - Phase 1
    Phase 2 Final Conference - Mantova (Italy)
    Phase 2 Kick Off Meeting - Baena (Spain)
    Phase 2 development

    Arwen Dewilde
    City of Ghent

    CONTACT US

    AYUNTAMIENTO DE BAENA

    Plaza de la Constitucion 1

    Baena (Cordoba) - Spain

    CONTACT US

    The INT-HERIT implementation network brings together 9 European cities facing challenges related to the revitalisation of their cultural heritage. These cities learn from each other and help each other to develop local strategies in order to make their cities an attractive place to live, work and visit. The network focuses on the implementation of innovative models through integrated and sustainable local strategies. It will increase awareness of strategies and plans, improving the capacity of cities to manage their heritage and enable their social and economic development.

    Innovative Heritage Management
    Ref nid
    8826
  • Freight TAILS

    Timeline

    Kick-off meeting in June (Suceava). Transnational meeting in October (Umea).
    Transnational meetings in February (Parma), April (Gdynia), May (Maastricht) and October (La Rochelle).
    Final event in May (Split).

    Municipality of Athienou
    2, Archbishop Makarios III Ave.
    7600 Athienou Cyprus

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Santiago de Compostela

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Udine (Italy)

    CONTACT US

    For any enquires into Tech Revolution, email: DMC@Barnsley.gov.uk

    Keep following our social media channels as we develop Tech Revolution 2.0 as part of the second wave of URBACT ||| Programme. 

    Follow our Twitter: @Tech_RevEu
    Follow our Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urbact-techrevolution/

    CONTACT US

    Coordinator

    ADDRESS

    Av. Movimento das Forças Armadas

    2700-595 Amadora

    Portugal 

    TELEPHONE

    +351 21 436 9000

    Ext. 1801

    CONTACT US

    City of Rome

    tamara.lucarelli@comune.roma.it

    Department of European Funds and Innovation

    Via Palazzo di Città, 1 - 10121 Turin (Italy)

     

    CONTACT US

    Câmara Municipal de Lisboa

    Departamento de Desenvolvimento Local

    Edifício Municipal, Campo Grande nº25, 6ºE | 1749 -099 Lisboa

    CONTACT US

    urbact.civicestate@gmail.com

    CONTACT US

    Laura González Méndez. Project coordinator.

    Gijón City Council

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Piraeus

    CONTACT US

    City of Ljubljana

    Mestni trg 1

    1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

    CONTACT US

    Project Coordinator Martin Neubert

    +49 371 355 7029

     

    CONTACT US

    Riga NGO House

    CONTACT US

    City of Antwarp
    Grote Markt 1 - 2000 Antwarpen

    Manchester City Council
    Manchester M2 5RT

    City of Rotterdam
    Coolsingel 40, 3011 AD Rotterdam

    City Council Bielefeld
    Bürger Service Center
    Phone +49 521 510

    CONTACT US

    City of Eindhoven
    Stadhuisplein 1, 5611 EM Eindhoven

    City of Loulé
    Praça da República, 8104-001 Loulé
    Phone +351 289 400 600

    CONTACT US

    City of Igualada
    Plaça de l'Ajuntament, 1, 08700 Igualada, Barcelona

    CONTACT US

    City of Ghent
    Stad Gent
    Botermarkt 1
    9000 Gent

    City of Genoa
    Via di Francia, 1 - XI floor. 16149 Genova

    CONTACT US

    City of San Donà di Piave Piazza Indipendenza, 13 – 30027

    CONTACT US

    City of Naples
    Urban Planning Department 
    Phone +39 081 7958932 - 34 - 17 

    CONTACT US

    The Barnsley Digital Media  County Way, Barnsley, S70 2JW
    Phone +44 01226 720700 

    CONTACT US

    Preston City Council
    Town Hall, Preston, PR1 2RL

    City of Piacenza
    piazza Cavalli 2 - 29121 Piacenza - Italia
    tel centralino 
    Phone +39 0523 492 111 

    City of Bilbao
    Plaza Ernesto Erkoreka nº1. 48007 Bilbao. Phone +32 944 204 200 

    City of Poznan
    plac Kolegiacki 17,
    61-841 Poznań

    CONTACT US

    Westmisnter City Council
    Phone +44 020 7641 6500

    Devoted to discovering Tailored and Innovative Logistic Solutions (TAILS) for the successful management of freight, this Action Planning network aimed on rethinking how freight can shape almost every aspect of our urban lives. The air we breathe, the noise we hear, the traffic we experience, the productiveness of our cities’ businesses, the quality of our surroundings and the liveability of our neighbourhoods. Everything can relate to a single question: how can we make freight transport more effective in cities?

    Tailored approaches for innovative logistic solutions
    Ref nid
    7374
  • Gen-Y City

    The Intercultural cities programme (ICC) supports cities in reviewing their policies through an intercultural lens and developing comprehensive intercultural strategies to help them manage diversity positively and realise the diversity advantage.

    Amadora launches a Guide on the welcoming of migrants

    Blue Economy Forum

    BluAct Toolkit

    BluAct: The Documentary

    2ndChance on Facebook

    2ndChance on Twitter

    Timeline

    Kick-off meeting in June (Torun). Transnational meeting in September (Wolverhampton) about 'Making the case for investment in creative-tech talent' and 'How to make best use of Labour Market Information'. Transnational meeting and The role of culture.
    'Transnational meeting about 'Smart Specialisation, Tech Hubs and Civic Tech Initiatives' transnational meeting in March (Coimbra); in July (Bologna) about 'Creative - Tech Talent Ecosystem Frameworks'.
    City Development Forum in January (Poznan). Final event in April (Poznan).

    Municipality of Athienou
    2, Archbishop Makarios III Ave.
    7600 Athienou Cyprus

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Santiago de Compostela

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Udine (Italy)

    CONTACT US

    For any enquires into Tech Revolution, email: DMC@Barnsley.gov.uk

    Keep following our social media channels as we develop Tech Revolution 2.0 as part of the second wave of URBACT ||| Programme. 

    Follow our Twitter: @Tech_RevEu
    Follow our Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urbact-techrevolution/

    CONTACT US

    Coordinator

    ADDRESS

    Av. Movimento das Forças Armadas

    2700-595 Amadora

    Portugal 

    TELEPHONE

    +351 21 436 9000

    Ext. 1801

    CONTACT US

    City of Rome

    tamara.lucarelli@comune.roma.it

    Department of European Funds and Innovation

    Via Palazzo di Città, 1 - 10121 Turin (Italy)

     

    CONTACT US

    Câmara Municipal de Lisboa

    Departamento de Desenvolvimento Local

    Edifício Municipal, Campo Grande nº25, 6ºE | 1749 -099 Lisboa

    CONTACT US

    urbact.civicestate@gmail.com

    CONTACT US

    Laura González Méndez. Project coordinator.

    Gijón City Council

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Piraeus

    CONTACT US

    City of Ljubljana

    Mestni trg 1

    1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

    CONTACT US

    Project Coordinator Martin Neubert

    +49 371 355 7029

     

    CONTACT US

    Riga NGO House

    CONTACT US

    City of Antwarp
    Grote Markt 1 - 2000 Antwarpen

    Manchester City Council
    Manchester M2 5RT

    City of Rotterdam
    Coolsingel 40, 3011 AD Rotterdam

    City Council Bielefeld
    Bürger Service Center
    Phone +49 521 510

    CONTACT US

    City of Eindhoven
    Stadhuisplein 1, 5611 EM Eindhoven

    City of Loulé
    Praça da República, 8104-001 Loulé
    Phone +351 289 400 600

    CONTACT US

    City of Igualada
    Plaça de l'Ajuntament, 1, 08700 Igualada, Barcelona

    CONTACT US

    City of Ghent
    Stad Gent
    Botermarkt 1
    9000 Gent

    City of Genoa
    Via di Francia, 1 - XI floor. 16149 Genova

    CONTACT US

    City of San Donà di Piave Piazza Indipendenza, 13 – 30027

    CONTACT US

    City of Naples
    Urban Planning Department 
    Phone +39 081 7958932 - 34 - 17 

    CONTACT US

    The Barnsley Digital Media  County Way, Barnsley, S70 2JW
    Phone +44 01226 720700 

    CONTACT US

    Preston City Council
    Town Hall, Preston, PR1 2RL

    City of Piacenza
    piazza Cavalli 2 - 29121 Piacenza - Italia
    tel centralino 
    Phone +39 0523 492 111 

    City of Bilbao
    Plaza Ernesto Erkoreka nº1. 48007 Bilbao. Phone +32 944 204 200 

    City of Poznan
    plac Kolegiacki 17,
    61-841 Poznań

    CONTACT US

    Over the last decades, younger people have increasingly chosen to live in urban areas, whilst the share of older residents in cities has generally fallen. Nevertheless, the impact of wage levels and different unemployment rates across Europe has lead youngsters to move mainly to big cities. In this, sense this Action Planning network aimed on developing, attracting and retaining young local talent, particularly, the creative talent from the Generation Y - people who were born between 1980 and 2000 - within cities of all sizes.

    Developing, attracting and retaining young local talent
    Ref nid
    7439
  • RetaiLink

    The Intercultural cities programme (ICC) supports cities in reviewing their policies through an intercultural lens and developing comprehensive intercultural strategies to help them manage diversity positively and realise the diversity advantage.

    Amadora launches a Guide on the welcoming of migrants

    Blue Economy Forum

    BluAct Toolkit

    BluAct: The Documentary

    Timeline

    Kick-off meeting in June (Igualada). Transnational meeting in October (Sibenik).
    Transnational meetings in February (Liberec), June (Pecs) and October (Romans).
    Final event in April (Hoogeven).

    Municipality of Athienou
    2, Archbishop Makarios III Ave.
    7600 Athienou Cyprus

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Santiago de Compostela

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Udine (Italy)

    CONTACT US

    For any enquires into Tech Revolution, email: DMC@Barnsley.gov.uk

    Keep following our social media channels as we develop Tech Revolution 2.0 as part of the second wave of URBACT ||| Programme. 

    Follow our Twitter: @Tech_RevEu
    Follow our Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urbact-techrevolution/

    CONTACT US

    Coordinator

    ADDRESS

    Av. Movimento das Forças Armadas

    2700-595 Amadora

    Portugal 

    TELEPHONE

    +351 21 436 9000

    Ext. 1801

    CONTACT US

    City of Rome

    tamara.lucarelli@comune.roma.it

    Department of European Funds and Innovation

    Via Palazzo di Città, 1 - 10121 Turin (Italy)

     

    CONTACT US

    Câmara Municipal de Lisboa

    Departamento de Desenvolvimento Local

    Edifício Municipal, Campo Grande nº25, 6ºE | 1749 -099 Lisboa

    CONTACT US

    urbact.civicestate@gmail.com

    CONTACT US

    Laura González Méndez. Project coordinator.

    Gijón City Council

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Piraeus

    CONTACT US

    City of Ljubljana

    Mestni trg 1

    1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

    CONTACT US

    Project Coordinator Martin Neubert

    +49 371 355 7029

     

    CONTACT US

    Riga NGO House

    CONTACT US

    City of Antwarp
    Grote Markt 1 - 2000 Antwarpen

    Manchester City Council
    Manchester M2 5RT

    City of Rotterdam
    Coolsingel 40, 3011 AD Rotterdam

    City Council Bielefeld
    Bürger Service Center
    Phone +49 521 510

    CONTACT US

    City of Eindhoven
    Stadhuisplein 1, 5611 EM Eindhoven

    City of Loulé
    Praça da República, 8104-001 Loulé
    Phone +351 289 400 600

    CONTACT US

    City of Igualada
    Plaça de l'Ajuntament, 1, 08700 Igualada, Barcelona

    CONTACT US

    This Action Planning network created strategic plans to enhance the competitiveness of small and/or independent retail businesses, considering them a key economic driver. The project’s scope of work includes areas such as regulation, employment, urban planning, managing public spaces, mobility, cultural and creative industries and citizens participation. The multi-stakeholder approach brings together public sector, private sector, retailers and major commercial operators, consumers or cultural and creative industries.

    Creating innovative strategies to revitalise the retail sector
    Ref nid
    7503
  • AVEIRO VISITED GIJÓN TO DIVE INTO GIJÓN CITIZEN CARD

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    15/11/2022

    Based on the Transfer Methodology designed by our Lead Expert, Miguel Sousa that combines a carrousel model where partners learn together and all partners participate in the transnational meetings and a radial model: bilateral/trilateral exchanges between each CARD4ALL partner and Gijon or other partners, we organised an immersive meeting in Gijón last February.

    Articles

    A delegation of different departments from Aveiro Municipality and a team of external consultants visited Gijón with the objective of learning the first steps of launching a Citizen Card model as well as knowing the experience of Gijón and the problems that Gijón has encountered. To solve technical question was also other of the objectives followed by Aveiro's team.

    We started with an overview of the services offered by Gijón Citizen Card and some statistics that illustrated the impact of its use in the city. Then, we went into the detail of 3 services that were of Aveiro's delegation interest: Gijón bikes, libraries and tourism. We finished the day with an interactive walk to real experience the use of Citizen Card and we had the opportunity to exchange with some citizens their impressions about Gijón Citizen Card.

    The next day was focused on 2 of the most important services of a Citizen Card: Transportation and Citizen Front Office. We visited the Public Transportation Company and they  explained how the Citizen Card data and payments are managed as well as the devices that are integrated in the buses to transfer those data.

    In the Citizen Front Office, we followed all the procedures to get a Citizen Card and a colleague  from Aveiro got one ready to use in Gijón. They explained also the different services that are digitalized in the Citizen Card and the use of the Citizen ATMs that Gijón has 24 located all around the city.

    Technical questions are always key when you face an implementation process with the scope of a Citizen Card and we had 2 sessions of Questions&Answers to solve the doubts of our colleagues from Aveiro and we finished presenting the new app that Gijón is going to launch soon and the integration of the Citizen Card in the institutional website.

     

    On the trip back to Aveiro, our colleagues shared their impressions in this interesting video:

     

    Last year, during the Clermont-Ferrand transnational meeting, we organized also another immersive meeting, but with a different approach, it was focused on transportation and allowed some partners to really know in detail the different services offered by Clermont Ferrand. You can download an informal testimony here:

    https://urbact.eu/sites/default/files/media/20191128_entry_diary_im_meeting_cf_laura_0.pdf

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    Ref nid
    13888
  • Social media to strengthen local commerce: The case of the Semaest in Paris

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    15/11/2022
    Foram aprovadas, pelo Comité de Monitorização URBACT, 23 Redes de Planeamento de Ação, as quais envolvem 26 países e 203 parceiros. A decisão teve lugar no dia 25 de junho de 2019, na reunião realizada em Alba Iulia. Com a aprovação destas redes, concluem-se os procedimentos concursais no âmbito do URBACT III.
    Articles

    In Paris an artisan toy store or a bookshop with a cafeteria can be good reasons to visit areas not traditionally invaded by the tourists, or visited by residents. However, it would be quite hard for residents and tourists to be constantly updated on the new products and activities organised by the shops located out of the city centre without the web portals and pages or accounts on social media, that are contributing to make these shops more popular in recent years. Across Europe, the widespread and growing use of social media contributes to the visibility of small retail businesses during an era where retail has been revolutionised by global platforms as Amazon. Paris is so committed to defending and supporting small shops that is has developed an integrated strategy which gives social media a decisive role as a driver of economic growth. Participation in the URBACT Network Interactive Cities has reinforced the framework created by Semaest, Paris’s semi-public planning company which promotes economic development and commercial diversity in different areas of the city.

    One of the things that Semaest does is to buy and do up abandoned shops and then rents them at low market prices to revitalise areas of the city where small shops and services are gradually disappearing. This approach has enabled the company to support 465 tenants through all the different steps towards the creation of innovative, quality shops. This dialogue and support has heightened the company’s awareness of the risks posed by the e-commerce to the survival of the local businesses but also of the opportunities connected to the use of apps, web portals and social media, which can contribute to make local shops more attractive and successful.

    "We are very aware of the difficulties of the retail sector. In 2014 while the debate on the role of e-commerce and global platforms was rising, we thought we had to do something to push shop keepers to use social media, to have a website or to be present on Google Maps." Emmanuelle Emeriau - European projects coordinator, Semaest.

    In order to respond to the needs identified through dialogue with the tenants of their shops, in 2015 Semaest launched CoSto – Connecting Stores, a programme aimed at supporting shop keepers and artisans in the use of social media to promote their activities and attract new clients. Meetups and breakfast with the managers of the businesses were organised to discuss problems and give advice on how social media could enhance their visibility. What was supposed to be just an activity of technical assistance on digital topics soon became a pivotal moment in creating a community of people advising each other and testing strategies and techniques to get the best from social media. Posting contents regularly on Facebook or Instagram, interacting with users and promoting special sales or offers for the followers became daily activities for most of the 1250 shopkeepers involved in the programme, who engaged their communities and attracted new visitors in multiethnic areas as Belleville or Goutte d’or as in the nearby municipality of Montreuil.

    "We really see the difference between 2015 and now. When we organised the first meetups we had to convince the shop keeper to be visible on Google Maps or on Facebook. Now they are convinced: the training was free of charge for them and thanks to this programme they had the opportunity to meet with communication experts, giving them very detailed advice on storytelling and messages to be promoted on Facebook or other social media platforms. The shop keepers are now aware of these tools, they know their needs but their job is still complicated. Now they have to deal with accountancy and providers, and at the same time have to structure their own communication strategies. They do it but we have plenty of shop keepers who are in difficulty, but we have a very rich tissue and network of shops and a widespread support to them." Emmanuelle Emeriau

    Many Parisian startups also got involved: The CoSto initiative helped startups and small shops to connect and collaborate. The objective was to make the shops a testing ground for innovative digital products and apps developed by young entrepreneurs. The calls for proposals launched by Semaest since 2016 brought ‘flash tests’ of innovative solutions on topics like green delivery or online visibility. Some of these experiences were consolidated and better structured through collaboration with the stakeholders involved in the Interactive Cities URBACT Local Group and became part of the “CoSto Pack”, a set of services and initiatives supporting shop keepers in Paris’s 18th , 19th and 20th arrondissement, the main target areas for Semaest.

    The digital platform Petitscommerces is an interesting example of how the collaboration between startups and local shops created growth both in the retail and digital sectors. Founded by the local startuppers Maxime Bedon and Jonathan Chelet, the platform supports proximity stores in their digital strategies, giving visibility to their stories and products through articles and pictures published on dedicated web pages but also giving them useful tools to better use Facebook or Instagram. More than 200 shops are now present on Petitscommerces.fr and the network is growing thanks to the word of mouth among shopkeepers. The platform is also expanding its presence to other French cities, such as Bordeaux and Nantes and now employ five people.

    "We decided to launch Petitscommerces.fr basically because as sons of shopkeepers (my parents are pharmacists, the parents of Jonathan are butchers) we realised that our parents were not present at all on the web, a problem that is common to many other small businesses. There is strength in numbers, so we had the idea to group them all on a platform which could make them more visible on search engines and social media platforms." Maxime Bedon, Founder of Petitscommerces

    Organic and craft products, independent bookshops and beauty farms are just some of the types of organisation on the platform, which portrays Paris as a city where small shops can really make the difference offering products and proximity services incomparable in terms of quality with big chain retail stores. The massive traction of Petitscommerces shows not only how promoting e-commerce and attracting customers through social media can create new incomes, but also how retail is socially connected and is an actor in urban well-being and participatory urbanism.

    These objectives are shared also by CMaRue, a local startup that launched in September 2017 a collaborative app giving residents the opportunity to chosse the businesses they would like to see in the empty shops of the 19th arrondissement. In one of the areas of Paris with the highest number of empty shops, the app is enabling residents to pin on a map the type of boutiques they would like to have in the neighbourhood: these preferences are then transmitted to the shop owners, who can use the suggestions to find the right tenant for their shops.

    "With CMaRue it is possible to mobilise people in advance, in favour of a business activity and not against it, collectively joining the needs of the neighbourhood." Nadia Tiourtite - Founder of CMaRue.

    In the first months of testing, there are already some positive results: an empty shop on Boulevard Indochine will host La fabrique Nomade, a workshop run by artisan refugees, thanks to the awareness raised by CMaRue on the topic of reuse of spaces.

    Petitscommerces and CmaRue are among the partners of the CoSto Pack that will be advertised to Parisian shop keepers through a common communication campaign on social media, the main output of the Interactive Cities Integrated Action Plan. The promotion of the wide range of tools and initiatives backed by CoSto on digital topics (among them a crowdfunding platform created by the startup Tudigo and the training on digital topics offered to unemployed people in deprived areas of the city) will contribute to promote new socio-economic areas in the Northern area of Paris and attract new startups and investors.

    But is not all about business. The extensive and integrated use of social media is also promoting community spirit and a sense of solidarity among local residents. An example of a relevant initiative promoted by CoSto is Le Carillon, a charity association creating with their social media tools a network of shop keepers who offer their support to homeless people for basic needs, such as the use of toilets or charging phones.

    Another example of combination between online tools and activities hosted by unusual places is Lulu dans ma rue, a neighbourhood concierge service connecting residents who need local services like home improvements or computer assistance and those who can offer such services at a reduced price.

    Conceiving a new role of social media and digital platforms as facilitator and multiplier of solutions co-produced by a network of shop keepers, start-uppers and civic officials is the mission accomplished by Interactive Cities in Paris. The city is reimagining the retail of tomorrow while testing concrete actions that are gradually changing streets and neighbourhoods.

    Takeaways for other cities

    • Engage with, and identify the needs of, local shop keepers: help them identify their problems and how digital solutions could help.
    • Involve the neighbourhood: position the relaunch of the shops not just as an issue of individual small business but as a common goal for the entire community.
    • Involve digital start-ups: create a programme that supports shop keepers and start-ups to develop joint solutions.
    • Prototype: Create pilot solutions that can show their potential and which can be further improved.
    • Communicate: it is essential to create a city wide ecosystem in which ongoing activities can resonate and reach a broader audience.
    Network
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    11200
  • INT-HERIT Transnational Meeting in Espinho

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    15/11/2022

    A total of 24 participants representing the nine member cities of the INT-HERIT network
    attended the transnational meeting held in Espinho between June 27th and 30th, 2018. The two
    URBACT project experts, Pedro Soutinho and Miguel Sousa, also attended, as well as an expert
    candidate to be contracted as Ad Hoc Expert in the next stage of the project, Eurico Neves. In the
    same way Ana Resende, representative of the NUP in Portugal and other collaborators and staff of
    the Municipal Chamber of Espinho, participated in the meeting.

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    Articles

    A list of all the attendees is included in the attached file, as well as the Agenda with the
    program of the different sessions and activities carried out.

    Espinho by the sea
    Espinho is much more than a city by the sea, even though it is in its origin and it is its most
    characteristic identity. Indeed, this can be contemplate in this video presented during the meeting
    and confirmed with the detailed explanations given by the Vice-Mayor of the city, Vicente Pinto, as
    we can see in the following presentation.

    In line with the important urban regeneration interventions that are being carried out, the
    municipality shares a question with neighbors and with guests such as those who attend this
    transnational meeting: What image, what idea and associated name should be given to the city at the
    end of this rehabilitation process? Which story should be told? How this should be communicated?

    Rehabilitation of the urban area
    The architect responsible for urban planning in the municipality, Sandra Almeida, presented the
    Urban Strategy of Espinho in relation to plans related to the improvement of mobility, social
    inclusion or urban regeneration, focusing in opportunities, challenges and existing risks. See the
    presentation.

    The architect Rui Lacerda, as the project's editor, presented the "Rehabilitation Plan of the public
    space of the Espinho rail-road" (ReCaFE), with a detailed explanation of the historical evolution
    that connects the municipality with the railway and the proposal technique to reuse the public space
    released after the burying of the train tracks.
    The visit to the Castro Ovil supposed an irruption of the natural spaces and the historical landscape
    near the urban center, including the rest of a primitive castro next to others of industrial character
    pertaining to an old factory of production of paper. Both elements are in the middle of a natural
    environment of great attractiveness that represents a challenge about how to approach strategies of
    use and integration at the same in the municipality.

    A peer review session
    As usual in the transnational meetings of the project, a peer review session, moderated by the expert
    Miguel Sousa, took place. Three groups shared critical analysis around three topics related to the
    presentations and visits commented before:

    1. Castro Ovil and its relation to the PARU / ReCAFE
    2. PARU / ReCaFE - Implementation Challenges on PPP's
    3. Branding new identity of the city storyteller

    See the presentation and questions produced to boost the creative debate between participants. A
    peer review report will be produced shortly.

    Bilateral activities in sight
    On behalf of Cahors and Mantova, Celine Julien and Emanuele Salmin, presented the details of two
    specific proposals from their respective cities, conceived as part of their participation in INT-HERIT
    and other actions related to cultural heritage, launching an open invitation to the partners of the
    network to generate bilateral learning through participation in two events. 

    Administrative and Financial Session
    On behalf of the Lead Partner of the INT-HERIT network, Antonio Zafra and María Bazuelo,
    updated the most relevant administrative and financial information related to the management of the
    project. In particular, three topics were presented in detail: characteristics and deadlines for the
    completion of the next reporting round, introduction to the characteristics of the procedure called
    Mid Term Review within the framework of the URBACT Program and the Ad Hoc Expert hiring
    proposal for ten days in the framework of the project. 
    The candidate proposed as Ad Hoc Expert, Eurico Neves, was invited to present a descriptive idea
    of the expert support to offer to the partners, as it contains the this file, passing this proposal
    according to the procedure established in the coming weeks by the Lead Partner to the URBACT
    Secretariat.

    Technical working session
    The Lead Expert of the INT-HERIT network conducted two technical sessions with the script that
    can be seen in the following presentation. In the first, focused on the monitoring objectives to be
    performed by the partners in relation to challenges 2 and 3 established by the Program, attendees
    were invited to update a tab of indicators adapted to their particular situation, a task already started
    in the meeting that took place in Alba Iulia. The second session was focused on deepening the
    practical development of results and products aimed at forming part of the OIF that each city must
    compile. In a practical way, through group work, attendees were able to practice making short
    videos for their dissemination on social networks.

    On the way to Sigulda
    Laura Skrodele, on behalf of the municipality of Sigulda made an introduction to the visit to the
    Castle of Sigulda which will be one of the central axes of the transnational seminar that the INTHERIT
    network that will be hold between September 25 and 28, 2018. Soon, the hostess city will
    send a draft of the Agenda and the organization of the meeting will begin.

     

    The Int-Herit Lead Partner Team

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  • 10 ways to engage SMEs in procurement

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    15/11/2022

    Historically Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) have faced a range of barriers in accessing procurement opportunities and in winning contracts. These barriers include: contracting authorities being unaware of SMEs and the types of goods and services they can potentially provide; SMEs viewing the procurement process, often rightly, as overly bureaucratic; SMEs not having the capacity to bid for opportunities and compete with large business; and the process of procurement often being undertaken on the basis of cost thus ruling out the ability of SMEs to demonstrate their wider value.

    Articles

    Whilst these barriers still exist, the European Procurement Directives of 2014 have a specific focus on supporting SMEs to engage with procurement processes. There is a specific emphasis upon: contracting authorities simplifying the process of procurement; contracting authorities breaking opportunities down into smaller lots; and reducing the levels of turnover required to participate in tendering exercise.

    At the last meeting of the Procure network held in Koprivnica, Croatia in March 2017, we wanted to explore how the above principles were translating into reality at the city level and what activities could be undertaken by cities to more effectively engage SMEs and local organisations in procurement. Collectively we identified 10 key ways which relate to common barriers:

    Mean 1 – supplier database - contracting authorities could overcome barriers around lack of knowledge of local businesses and SMEs by developing a database of potential suppliers. This could be linked to spend analysis and particularly the goods and services leaking out of the local economy. The database could be used to make local businesses and SMEs aware of upcoming opportunities.

    Mean 2 – streamline documentation - contracting authorities could overcome barriers around the bureaucracy facing local businesses and SMEs by streamlining the tender process so that less questions are asked and less complex questions are asked.

    Mean 3 – pre-procurement engagement – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around engagement with local businesses and SMEs by involving them in the design of goods and services and holding ‘meet the buyer’ events before the start of a formal procurement exercise.

    Mean 4 – use social and environmental criteria – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around the overemphasis upon cost in procurement by embedding social and environmental criteria into the process and additionally considerations around quality.

    Mean 5 – provide training – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around capacity and capability to bid for procurement opportunities by providing specific training in coordination with other partners for SMEs and local businesses.

    Mean 6 – give greater weighting – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around the inability of SMEs and local businesses to properly demonstrate social value by applying greater weighting to it in the procurement process.

    Mean 7 – lotting – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around SMEs and local businesses not being able to access procurement opportunities as a result of their scale by breaking contracts down into smaller lots.

    Mean 8 – local portals – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around advertising being cross-Europe by developing their own local portals with opportunities advertised specifically in the local market.

    Mean 9 – more flexibility – contracting authorities could overcome barriers around requirements of SMEs in particular by reducing the amount of documentation and supporting evidence they need to provide.

    Mean 10 – require local and SME tenders below threshold – contracting authorities can overcome the barrier around the time procurement exercises take, by adopting different process for below threshold opportunities. This could include requiring a certain number of local businesses or SMEs to bid.

     

    Realising the potential of SMEs through procurement is essential to all cities across Europe. In the vast majority of cities the greatest proportion of businesses are SMEs, with the greatest proportion of jobs being with SMEs. However, compared to their scale, SMEs are under-represented in the delivery of public procurement contracts. SMEs can bring a range of benefits for our local economies and procurement is a really important lever in realising their potential.

    Matthew Jackson is the Lead Expert for the Procure network.

    Matthew is the Deputy Chief Executive of the Centre for Local Economic Strategies (CLES)    

     

     

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