• CREATIVE SPIRITS

    Timeline

    Phase 1 kick-off

    Phase 2 kick-off

    Phase 2 development

    Final event

    Arwen Dewilde
    City of Ghent

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    AYUNTAMIENTO DE BAENA

    Plaza de la Constitucion 1

    Baena (Cordoba) - Spain

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    Artur Katai
    City of Újbuda

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    The partner cities from this Implementation network have a common need to improve the implementation of their existing integrated urban strategies and action plans by including new approaches linked to creative and cultural industries (CCI) – creative places, people, and businesses. The joint policy challenge for the network is to better facilitate the above 'creative ecosystem' to be able to attract (more) creative entrepreneurs and boost creative entrepreneurship in dedicated urban areas, this comprises activities that create economic value through the generation and exploitation of intellectual property. A city is able to mobilise ideas, talents and creative organisations when it knows how to foster a creative milieu by identifying, nurturing, attracting and sustaining talent. Local governments all over the world are increasingly becoming aware of the CCI’s potential to generate jobs, wealth, and cultural engagement.

    Boosting creative entrepreneurship through creative-based urban strategies
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    8781
  • The power of arts and green

    Germany
    Pforzheim

    Using art, green and citizens in the transformation of urban areas

    Reinhard Maier
    Responsible for urban renewal
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    118 000

    Summary

    With a concentration of problems like lack of social cohesion, littering and damage to property in its 3 000-person multicultural district of Kaiser-Friedrich-Street (KEF),  the city of Pforzheim (DE) followed an integrated and participative approach to revitalise the district. In order to make the living environment more pleasant and to improve cohesion, the idea of an artistic project and greener spaces emerged from the population. At the initiative of  inhabitants, a sculpture mile with 100 new trees was created with the help of a local artist.  The sculptures with the trees improved the quality of time spent in the public spaces. Meeting points arose and contributed to intergenerational and intercultural exchanges. The new urban green space provides a significant contribution to the fight against climate change and the inhabitants have taken responsibility for their environment as tree sponsors. Likewise, the district has gained a new image through art.  The project is consciously designed on a long-term basis in which the existing works of art are replaced by new ones every three years.

    The solutions offered by the good practice

    Within the framework of the integrated urban development, a survey of strengths and weaknesses was carried out. Many problems in the neighbourhood, such as lack of cohesion, litter and damage to property, were due to the fact that many residents did not identify with their neighbourhood, and the district had a bad image within the whole city. The good practice offered the following solution: inhabitants strongly involved in the shaping of the previously disadvantaged neighbourhood and by the realisation of a renowned sculpture mile. The identification the citizens have with their quarter has been significantly strengthened. The sculptures along with more than 100 new trees improved the quality of time spent in the public spaces. Meeting points arose, contributing to the activation of urban life and to intergenerational and intercultural exchange. New networks or productive neighbourhoods lead to the emergence of solutions from the district for other challenges, such as unemployment or the increase of anonymity. The new urban green space provides a significant contribution to the fight against climate change, and the inhabitants have taken responsibility for their environment as tree sponsors. The emergence of ownership through “Urban Nature” thus represents a formidable solution and has helped to strengthen the identity and self-confidence of the inhabitants. Likewise, the district has gained a new image through art.

    Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

    In 2007, urban renewal began in the district of KEF. The starting point was a survey of existing strengths and weaknesses in the quarter within the framework of the Integrated Urban Development Approach. The overall goal is to create the best possible conditions for sustainable urban living in a deprived quarter involving all relevant stakeholders as civil society, practitioners, elected representatives, city and district managers or the private sector. Within the framework of the integrated and sustainable urban development concept, the following tasks were defined as relevant: housing/residential environment; social and cultural infrastructure; identification, coexistence, active citizens; public space/transport; local supply/local economy; climate and the environment. Progress and difficulties are summarised in an annual factual report. To make the living environment more comfortable and to improve identification, the idea of an artistic project, together with a local artist, emerged from the population in addition to the streets being made greener. The project Urban Nature was born. It is a sustainable and affordable practice bringing together social, cultural, economic and environmental actions. The project is consciously designed for the long term, in which the existing works of art are replaced by new ones every three years. Thus, the project is constantly being given new momentum.

    Based on a participatory approach

    From the start, the urban renewal process has followed an integrated and participatory approach. Urban Nature is a project of local citizens. The idea arose in the district council, consisting of 25 citizens and traders who meet once a month. Not all ideas and proposals can be implemented, but it is positive to note that citizens have a strong sense of cost-consciousness. In addition, great importance is attached to the fact that the district council is involved in the implementation of the measures themselves. This clarifies that the body can express wishes, but they can only be implemented if citizens contribute. Due to the close cooperation among different stakeholders in the district council, the idea of the sculpture mile and the greenery quickly resulted in concrete plans. The city administration was responsible for setting the foundations for the sculptures, planting the trees, lighting etc. René Dantes, a local artist, created five sculptures. Citizens assume responsibility for the care of the trees and the sculptures. Companies from the district and the entire city committed themselves to sponsoring. The good practice Urban Nature is a real example for community-based peacemaking with, and not for, communities. It is a project which demonstrates the strong commitment of local stakeholders in the development and implementation of the practice, which has led to a high level of acceptance and sustainability.

    What difference has it made?

    The concentration of numerous negative factors had resulted in a depreciation process with missing cohesion, misuse, damage to property. The sculpture mile Urban Nature has significantly contributed to the improvement of the situation in the district. The most important impacts are: Residents identify more strongly with their neighbourhood and with the sculpture closest to their home. They talk about the developments in the district and discuss the change, which was rarely the case before. The sculptures have also become important places for identification and encounter. The image of the neighbourhood has changed. In addition, the trees contribute to the fight against climate change. The inhabitants take responsibility for their environment as tree mentors. There is no other district which provides such an abundance of possibilities for participation. Results achieved are: • Creation of meeting points for the activation of the urban life as well as for intergenerational and intercultural exchange, • Strengthening private retailers, service and commercial enterprises, • Creating a new environment for sustainable urban living As statistical data is not yet available for 2016, it is difficult to give evidence of impact. However, the stakeholders have the impression that the project resulted in a stabilisation of the social structure, mixed population and active neighbourhoods and overall improved the quality of the housing environment.

    Why should other European cities use it?

    The Urban Nature project demonstrates how large numbers of citizens have been able to make major changes in a neighbourhood through the participation of numerous stakeholders. It shows that it does not always require large projects or large sums of money to achieve sustainable change and to positively change a neighbourhood. The project is certainly of great interest to other European cities. The importance of art and the environment is often underestimated in urban development projects. Urban Nature offers solutions to challenges faced by other European cities, such as demographic change, integration as well as climate change, by identifying a sustainable and affordable practice which cities can transfer to their local context. It should be emphasised that the project originated from the district and thus the identification is particularly large. This gives other European cities the opportunity to transfer the knowledge, but still develop their own projects - adapted to the context on site. Due to the great reach and enthusiasm that the project has created in the region, there is certainly interest in Urban Nature in other cities.

    Is a transfer practice
    0
    Ref nid
    9510
  • Culture for climate change

    Manchester

    Mobilising arts and culture sector to contribute to local climate change policies

    Jonny Sadler
    Programme Director, Manchester Climate Change Agency
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    511 852

    Summary

    Arts and culture sector collaboration on climate action and engagement in a city which recognises the value of culture and is itself demonstrating climate change leadership, linked to two of the key local challenges that run through the city’s climate change strategy:
    • mobilising business action on climate change through a sector-specific approach
    • engaging and mobilising citizens to act on climate change

    The solutions offered by the good practice

    This model of sector collaboration is rooted in the city and enables members to meet face-to-face on a regular basis, share common challenges and opportunities and link directly to what is happening on a city level. The group is chaired by members on a revolving basis, and able to fund small projects and reporting through an annual membership contribution of £7,000. Action on energy has led to a 16% reduction in emissions over three years, avoiding 2,800 tonnes CO2 and £0.9 million, largely through zero to low-cost measures. The group also works on a range of topics from green energy procurement to sustainable materials Members are using creativity to engage employees, audiences and communities, with many bringing climate change themes in programming and learning activities. The group is taking an active role in shaping and delivering city climate change strategy.

    Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

    MAST’s external-facing activities involve Manchester citizens in both the development and the implementation of local climate change policy. For example, MAST’s “Our City, Our Planet” event worked with young people to help define the sustainable city they want. Climate Control at Manchester Museum focused on climate change and how people can take action. Over 90,000 visitors attended and were encouraged to contribute towards Manchester’s Climate Change Strategy 2017-50. Integrated and participative approach Manchester has an overarching strategy for 2016-25, Our Manchester, which was developed based on the views of local citizens and organisations. The strategy’s delivery is overseen and driven by the Our Manchester Forum, a partnership of senior politicians, public sector, the private sector and NGO leaders. Manchester’s arts and culture sector is represented on the Forum through the chair of the Manchester Cultural Partnership. MAST enables the Partnership to focus on Our Manchester’s climate change objectives, as part of the city’s wider social, economic.

    Based on a participatory approach

    Manchester’s cultural community has been working together through MAST (Manchester Arts Sustainability Aeam) since 2011, to understand, share, solve and scale climate change action. MAST brings together diverse arts and cultural organisations, about 30 in total, from community-based arts centres and iconic cultural venues to an internationally renowned festival and national broadcasters, in a participatory and non-prescriptive way. Different activities have also been carried out to engage with citizens: • Practical action and creative responses - productions, exhibitions, events, etc. – which engage audiences and communities on environmental and climate change themes, now go hand in hand, for example, • HOME Manchester and the Whitworth Gallery’s wide- ranging environmental programmes across buildings, procurement, transport, public engagement and programming • Manchester International Festival‘s organic urban farming partnership with the Biospheric Foundation, engaging thousands of community volunteers • Contact Young Company’s ‘Climate of Fear’, a show exploring the emotion of anger through themes of climate justice, social inequality, memory and the body ITV’s inclusion of climate change in Coronation Street’s storyline, the UK’s most popular soap opera • Arts and culture-based activities proved particularly effective and popular in 2016’s Climate Lab, an experimental programme, run by the Manchester Climate Change Agency, to test different ways of engaging citizens in developing its 2017-2050 climate change strategy. One of ClimateLab highlights was Climate Control at Manchester Museum, a six-month long series of exhibitions and events, attended by over 90,000 people, exploring what kind of future people hope for and how to make it a reality.

    What difference has it made?

    MAST is getting support in different forms: • MLA Renaissance North West. a museum programme: provided external funding for the MAST group in its first two years • Julie’s Bicycle, a charity supporting climate action in the creative community: facilitated the group in the first two years; supported MAST in defining joint commitments and an emissions reduction target; did annual tracking and progress reporting; supports MAST development; disseminates the MAST model and achievements in the UK and abroad • Arts Council England: environmental reporting, policy and action plan requirements for funded organisations since 2012 – including the majority of MAST members – and an accompanying environmental support programme, delivered in partnership with Julie’s Bicycle, further reinforces MAST commitments and provides MAST members with a range of exchange and learning opportunities • Carbon Literacy Project (CLP): carbon literacy training undertaken by a number of members; a few members, such as HOME and Manchester Museum, now deliver organisation-wide training; in 2016, MAST partnered with CLP, Manchester Metropolitan University and HOME to adapt the training for the arts and culture sector MAST grew from the Manchester Cultural Partnership’s desire to explore how arts and cultural organisations could contribute to the city’s first climate change strategy 2010-2020 In 2013 MAST set a target of an annual 7% emissions reduction in line with the city’s target of a 41% reduction by 2020 – over three years it achieved an annual 5% reduction MAST supported development of the city’s 2017-2050 climate change strategy MAST’s chair is now a member of the Manchester Climate Change Board, a stakeholder group which oversees and champions delivery of the 2017-2050 climate change strategy MAST is now working with the climate change agency and board to establish how the arts and culture in the city can make its fair contribution to the Paris Agreement, and align with Greater Manchester’s 2038 carbon neutrality ambition – announcement expected in 2019.

    Transferring the practice

    Over 2.5 years, Manchester has led the C-Change network, transferring its practice to 5 other cities: Wroclaw (Poland), Mantua (Italy), Gelsenkirchen (Germany), Sibenik (Croatia), Águeda (Portugal). You can, in particular, check Mantua’s Good practice here. The approach was based on Manchester’s experience adaptable to each city’s reality and focused on: Sector collaboration on climate change, Sector support on climate change understanding, action and engagement, Sector involvement in city climate change policy and strategy and/or other related city policies and strategies and Citizen engagement, awareness-raising and public participation. The final outputs are all available here: https://www.g-mast.org/c-change. The practice of Manchester is also currently being transferred in a cascaded way from Mantua to other Italian cities.

    Is a transfer practice
    0
    Ref nid
    9506