• Freight TAILS

    Timeline

    Kick-off meeting in June (Suceava). Transnational meeting in October (Umea).
    Transnational meetings in February (Parma), April (Gdynia), May (Maastricht) and October (La Rochelle).
    Final event in May (Split).

    Municipality of Athienou
    2, Archbishop Makarios III Ave.
    7600 Athienou Cyprus

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Santiago de Compostela

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Udine (Italy)

    CONTACT US

    For any enquires into Tech Revolution, email: DMC@Barnsley.gov.uk

    Keep following our social media channels as we develop Tech Revolution 2.0 as part of the second wave of URBACT ||| Programme. 

    Follow our Twitter: @Tech_RevEu
    Follow our Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urbact-techrevolution/

    CONTACT US

    Coordinator

    ADDRESS

    Av. Movimento das Forças Armadas

    2700-595 Amadora

    Portugal 

    TELEPHONE

    +351 21 436 9000

    Ext. 1801

    CONTACT US

    City of Rome

    tamara.lucarelli@comune.roma.it

    Department of European Funds and Innovation

    Via Palazzo di Città, 1 - 10121 Turin (Italy)

     

    CONTACT US

    Câmara Municipal de Lisboa

    Departamento de Desenvolvimento Local

    Edifício Municipal, Campo Grande nº25, 6ºE | 1749 -099 Lisboa

    CONTACT US

    urbact.civicestate@gmail.com

    CONTACT US

    Laura González Méndez. Project coordinator.

    Gijón City Council

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Piraeus

    CONTACT US

    City of Ljubljana

    Mestni trg 1

    1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

    CONTACT US

    Project Coordinator Martin Neubert

    +49 371 355 7029

     

    CONTACT US

    Riga NGO House

    CONTACT US

    City of Antwarp
    Grote Markt 1 - 2000 Antwarpen

    Manchester City Council
    Manchester M2 5RT

    City of Rotterdam
    Coolsingel 40, 3011 AD Rotterdam

    City Council Bielefeld
    Bürger Service Center
    Phone +49 521 510

    CONTACT US

    City of Eindhoven
    Stadhuisplein 1, 5611 EM Eindhoven

    City of Loulé
    Praça da República, 8104-001 Loulé
    Phone +351 289 400 600

    CONTACT US

    City of Igualada
    Plaça de l'Ajuntament, 1, 08700 Igualada, Barcelona

    CONTACT US

    City of Ghent
    Stad Gent
    Botermarkt 1
    9000 Gent

    City of Genoa
    Via di Francia, 1 - XI floor. 16149 Genova

    CONTACT US

    City of San Donà di Piave Piazza Indipendenza, 13 – 30027

    CONTACT US

    City of Naples
    Urban Planning Department 
    Phone +39 081 7958932 - 34 - 17 

    CONTACT US

    The Barnsley Digital Media  County Way, Barnsley, S70 2JW
    Phone +44 01226 720700 

    CONTACT US

    Preston City Council
    Town Hall, Preston, PR1 2RL

    City of Piacenza
    piazza Cavalli 2 - 29121 Piacenza - Italia
    tel centralino 
    Phone +39 0523 492 111 

    City of Bilbao
    Plaza Ernesto Erkoreka nº1. 48007 Bilbao. Phone +32 944 204 200 

    City of Poznan
    plac Kolegiacki 17,
    61-841 Poznań

    CONTACT US

    Westmisnter City Council
    Phone +44 020 7641 6500

    Devoted to discovering Tailored and Innovative Logistic Solutions (TAILS) for the successful management of freight, this Action Planning network aimed on rethinking how freight can shape almost every aspect of our urban lives. The air we breathe, the noise we hear, the traffic we experience, the productiveness of our cities’ businesses, the quality of our surroundings and the liveability of our neighbourhoods. Everything can relate to a single question: how can we make freight transport more effective in cities?

    Tailored approaches for innovative logistic solutions
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  • SmartImpact

    Timeline

    Kick-off meeting in June (Dublin). Transnational meeting in October (Stockholm).
    Transnational meetings in February (Miskolc), April (Zagreb), June (Porto) and October (Guadalajara).
    Final event in March (Manchester).

    Municipality of Athienou
    2, Archbishop Makarios III Ave.
    7600 Athienou Cyprus

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Santiago de Compostela

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Udine (Italy)

    CONTACT US

    For any enquires into Tech Revolution, email: DMC@Barnsley.gov.uk

    Keep following our social media channels as we develop Tech Revolution 2.0 as part of the second wave of URBACT ||| Programme. 

    Follow our Twitter: @Tech_RevEu
    Follow our Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urbact-techrevolution/

    CONTACT US

    Coordinator

    ADDRESS

    Av. Movimento das Forças Armadas

    2700-595 Amadora

    Portugal 

    TELEPHONE

    +351 21 436 9000

    Ext. 1801

    CONTACT US

    City of Rome

    tamara.lucarelli@comune.roma.it

    Department of European Funds and Innovation

    Via Palazzo di Città, 1 - 10121 Turin (Italy)

     

    CONTACT US

    Câmara Municipal de Lisboa

    Departamento de Desenvolvimento Local

    Edifício Municipal, Campo Grande nº25, 6ºE | 1749 -099 Lisboa

    CONTACT US

    urbact.civicestate@gmail.com

    CONTACT US

    Laura González Méndez. Project coordinator.

    Gijón City Council

    CONTACT US

    Municipality of Piraeus

    CONTACT US

    City of Ljubljana

    Mestni trg 1

    1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

    CONTACT US

    Project Coordinator Martin Neubert

    +49 371 355 7029

     

    CONTACT US

    Riga NGO House

    CONTACT US

    City of Antwarp
    Grote Markt 1 - 2000 Antwarpen

    Manchester City Council
    Manchester M2 5RT

    The focus of this Action Planning network was less about technology solutions per se, but more about governance structures, process and business models. The partner cities are specifically worked together to: develop models of how organisations can adapt their structures to deliver smart cities; effectively finance smart solutions and creating new ways of understanding value with co-investment strategies; develop and support innovation ecosystems within cities; explore the role of regulations and incentives, e.g. the carrot and stick approach; better understand how data integration and urban data platforms can support the smart city.

    Cities, people and the promotion of smart, sustainable development
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  • 2020. How will it be remembered by URBACT?

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    15/11/2022

    Knowledge Hub Editor Ed Thorpe wraps up the URBACT programme’s main takeaways from 2020 – it was quite a year. 

    News

    It’s fair to say that 2020 didn’t totally turn out as most of us planned. It’s been a year of major personal and professional challenges. Nevertheless, when I look back on the things we said we’d be looking out for in 2020 at URBACT, what strikes me is how robust we’ve managed to be at keeping up with what needs to be done.

     

    From a programme perspective, Covid hasn’t so much overthrown URBACT’s underlying assumptions, as reinforced their importance. We need participatory and integrated approaches to local sustainable development more than ever. And we’ve written this year about the ongoing urgency of issues such as urban poverty, food solidarity, gender equal cities and the climate emergency in times of Covid.

     

    Furthermore, it’s clear that strength can come from adversity. Lockdowns and the decimation of international travel might once have dealt a body blow to a programme based on transnational peer learning and exchange. But, in many ways, 2020 was the year that brought transnational networking into the 21st century.

     

    URBACT’s first ever e-University

     

    URBACT’s big events are famous for their positive energy and camaraderie - bringing together ambitious city actors in order to exchange, motivate and learn. So it isn’t surprising that many people in URBACT had a real sense of loss when the planned 2020 Summer University in Dubrovnik had to be cancelled.

     

    But necessity is the mother of invention and the outcome was a step change in URBACT’s ability to work remotely on a large scale. URBACT’s first ever e-University was not without its challenges, but is undoubtedly one of the main highlights of this year, opening up a new range of possibilities for the ambition of future online transnational exchanges.

     

    URBACT’s famous Summer University for cities was transformed into an e-University in 2020.

     

    The event was aimed at the participating cities in URBACT’s latest round of Action Planning Networks that kicked off their action planning (Phase 2) in May 2020. But anyone can still benefit from all the tools provided for the development of integrated approaches to sustainable urban development. Check out the URBACT toolbox now; and bookmark the page for when you need those tools later in the year!

     

    Building on 2020 as a year of digital transition for URBACT, the programme has also appointed a set of ‘digital buddies’. These experts are available to all our networks and cities as they look to develop their own capacity to make the most of digital tools in their activities and meetings - from the local to the transnational.

     

    The New Leipzig Charter

     

    2020 will also be remembered for the refreshing of the 2007 Leipzig Charter on Sustainable European Cities under the German Presidency. The New Leipzig Charter sets out an updated vision for sustainable urban policy in Europe based on “the transformative power of cities for the common good”. Adopted in late November, URBACT was delighted to have been able to contribute so constructively to its elaboration.

     

    URBACT was a key partner in the development of the New Leipzig Charter adopted under the German Presidency in 2020.

     

    Check out the videos, reports, articles and city voices linked to the four URBACT City Labs that URBACT organised in collaboration with the German Presidency and others - exploring the key themes of participation, sustainability, integration and place-based approaches.

     

    URBACT now looks forward to continuing to support the capacity of Europe’s cities – both small and large – to put the New Charter into practice and to illustrate the implementation of the Charter’s vision of the ‘just’, ‘green’ and ‘productive’ city.

    URBACT as a knowledge hub

     

    URBACT is (hopefully!) best known for its networks of cities working to explore solutions to common urban development challenges. URBACT is about capacity building, expert support, peer learning and stakeholder involvement. But, as 2020 has shown, URBACT is also a key knowledge hub on urban development topics: both as a provider and broker of knowledge.

     

    This year has shown the vitality and value of URBACT’s knowledge development and related collaborations with others. I have already mentioned the excellent collaboration with the German Presidency in the refreshing of the Leipzig Charter.

     

    URBACT also co-led an ambitious project with Urban Innovative Actions (UIA) on cities engaging in the right to housing in Europe. Following three webinars this year on ‘cooperative housing’, ‘housing exclusion’ and ‘fair finance’, watch out for a new joint URBACT-UIA knowledge platform on this topic for 2021!

     

    URBACT has continued to strengthen its role as a provider and broker of knowledge – on topics such as cities implementing the right to housing.

     

    Experts and cities from URBACT have continued engagement with the Urban Agenda for the EU, notably through the Partnerships on housing and public procurement. New in 2020, URBACT is also now directly involved in implementation of 2 of the 11 planned actions of the Partnership on Culture and Cultural Heritage – including building on the work of the URBACT Tourism Friendly Cities and ACCESS networks. Look out for more information in 2021!

     

    Ongoing city networking and peer learning

     

    In amongst these highlights, URBACT has continued to support 46 city networks throughout 2020, involving more than 337 partner cities from 30 European countries (EU-27 + UK, Norway and Switzerland) working together on more urban development topics than I could possibly name!

     

    URBACT’s 23 good practice Transfer Networks (TNs) are right now pulling together the city stories, lessons and outcomes of their three years of activity to explore how an URBACT-validated good practice from one city can be broken down, understood and adapted to the reality in a different city. Having benefitted from a 6-month extension to their activities, the Transfer Network ‘Sharing Period’ is now foreseen for the first half of 2021. Understanding how to effectively transfer good practice is one of the key challenges of European policy and practice in any sector – so keep your eye out for the results!

     

    A recent internal event created this map of the diverse city stories from all across Europe emerging from URBACT’s 23 Transfer Networks.

     

    Meanwhile, the second round of 23 Action Planning Networks (APNs) supported by URBACT III have been moving ahead with their stakeholder engagement and integrated action planning as best they can in the circumstances. They have also been exploring a new aspect for URBACT APNs in the current cycle: the implementation of small-scale innovations. Don’t forget to follow developments in your favourite network by checking out their page on the URBACT website or finding them on social media!

     

    A final word

     

    If you are anything like me, it’s been frankly hard to enjoy 2020 and to keep spirits high at times. And we cannot forget how many of us have been impacted on a personal basis by the difficult events of this year. But 2020 will also be a year that we can look back on with some shared professional pride. Only time will tell, but we may look back and see 2020 as a year that made us stronger and that marked a turning point in our digital – and maybe green – transitions.

     

    That said, here at URBACT, we look forward to seeing as many of you as possible in person in 2021 -  and to seeing what more we can achieve together for more sustainable towns and cities in Europe!

     

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  • INT-HERIT TRANSNATIONAL MEETING ALBA IULIA - INTERVIEW VIDEOS

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    15/11/2022
    The 9th newsletter of USER project, issued in April 2015.
    Articles

    They discussed about different subjects but all of them around 'Cultural Heritage Management' and the difficulties during the phase of the implementation.

    We have five interviews in which you can meet:

    1. Antonio Zafra - Lead Partner Project Coordinator, Baena (Spain).

    2. Ana Dumitran, curator at Museikon museum in Alba Iulia (Romania).

    3. Nicolae Neag, Communication and PR Expert at Princely Palace Project, Alba Iulia Municipality.

    4. PhD. Doina Hendre Biro, Scientific Consultant for Alba Iulia Municipality.

    5. Jean Michel Leniaud, President of the Scientific Council of the National Institute of Heritage, Professor at the EPHE, the National School of Charters and former UNESCO Consultant.

    Please click on the link and watch these videos to learn about theirs experiences!

     

    Network
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  • Gender equality in cities

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    15/11/2022

    On March 8 we celebrate UN International Women’s Day- a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

    URBACT is taking part in these celebrations by featuring a series of articles about women’s leadership in European cities on the governance webpage this month.

    In upcoming items we will explore initiatives in women’s equality in cities and hear the views of some current urban leaders. The results of a panel debate on the impact of female leadership in cities at the Women of the World Festival in London will also be published.

    We start with a review of data on the levels of female political representation at city level in in Europe.

    Articles

    Female leadership at city level

    More than two thirds of the European population lives in cities. The way they are designed, planned and led impacts our everyday existence. As the sphere of governance closest to the people, local authorities are well placed to combat the persistence and reproduction of inequalities, and to promote a truly equal society. Cities have the competences to undertake concrete actions in favour of equality of women and men, both directly and in cooperation with local stakeholders.

    Equality in the EU Treaties

    Equality between women and men is enshrined in the EU Treaties and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights as a fundamental principle of the European Union (EU). Ensuring gender equality is one of the EU's main objectives and tasks. Despite significant progress during the last decades thanks to regulatory pressure, gender inequalities persist in leadership positions and the pace of change is slow in many Member States.

    The facts of the matter

    It is not a straightforward task to find or indeed collect comparable data on female representation, due to different government structures at community, local, regional levels. There is a tendency to monitor and recognise female political office and achievement at international and national levels, less so the city level. The availability and dissemination of data on the gender ratio in national parliaments across countries and over time (for instance through the website of the InterParliamentary Union) has enabled researchers to study this issue and has provided policy-makers and interest groups with current figures and trends of the situation. However, the picture is different when it comes to elected decision-makers on the sub-national level.

    What data we do have shows an unbalanced picture a cross the EU member states.

     

    So what is the current status of gender balance in EU city leadership?

    Several surveys and reports listed here give us an idea.

    According to a European Commission report published in 2013 Women and men in leadership positions in the European Union 

    There is a slightly better gender balance amongst politicians at regional and local level than at national level. Across the EU, women account for nearly a third (32%) of members of regional assemblies (2012 data) and the same share of local (usually municipal) councils (2011 data) compared to 27% in national parliaments (2013 data) (Figure 19). Balanced representation (considered to be at least 40% of each gender) has been achieved in four countries (France, Sweden, Finland and Spain) at regional level but only in one, Sweden, at local level. At the other end of the scale, in regional assemblies men heavily outnumber women in Hungary (91%), Italy (87%), Romania (85%), Slovakia (84%), Greece (83%) and the Czech Republic (81%). There are fewer extreme imbalances in local authorities with Ireland and Greece being the only EU countries in which women account for less than one in five representatives. The share of women in regional assemblies was already 30% in 2004 and has risen only 2 percentage points since.

    In 2013 Aksel Sundström, of the University of Gothenburg published the  Women’s Local Political Representation within 30 European Countries

    The map of EU, included in the report, gives an interesting picture of the share of female councillors although again the author insists it is often difficult to record patterns as a result of varying institutional structures, lack of data collection or availability and varying responsibilities of local councillors.

    Glass ceiling effect

    It would seem that, as in other sectors, there is a glass ceiling, meaning that the share of women reaching the most senior positions in local politics is still low. Much of the research shows that women are often very active in grass roots, community level actions, but this fails to translate into significant numbers reaching leadership positions such as portfolio holders, mayors and deputy mayors. The same barriers are cited, such as lack of support to enable women to have a job, a family and become politically active and persistently male culture and bias in political parties and systems. 

    CEMR’s review on Women in Local Politics in Europe: Figures from 34 European Countries of CEMR’s membership in 2008 gives a comprehensive view, also of female mayors in 31 European countries.The range is from 3 to 30% but in the majority of member states it is well below 20%.

    So- the scorecard might say ‘must do better!’ More effort is still needed to harness the talent of the EU’s female political talent to enable them to bring their voices to urban leadership.

    In the next features we will report on gender equality initiatives in cities across Europe, and present the perspectives of female leaders.

    Thanks to Jenna Norman for additonal research.

     

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  • USER

    Timeline

    Project launch
    Project completed

    A core USER idea is that the design of urban public spaces and the main goals of urban planning are challenged by rapid changes in how cities are used. New trends in how public spaces are used, what the new users’ needs are, increasing malfunctions and conflicts among uses, etc., are challenging the way the city is usually “produced”, designed and managed.

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