• Eddy Adams

    Available for Lead Expert role and Ad-hoc expertise missions

    Expert can perform the Lead expert role and Ad hoc expertise missions at network and programme level in relation to:

     

    1. The design and delivery of (transnational) exchange and learning activities

     

    2. Thematic expertise:
    [Climate adaptation, Jobs and skills, Strategic urban planning]

     

    3. Methods and tools for integrated and participatory approaches:
    > Integrated and participatory design of strategies
     

     

  • Paola Pasino

    Paola Pasino is a change maker, with a background in architecture and urban design, dedicated to human centric design and the transformation of cities into vibrant, inclusive, and sustainable urban environments. With over 15 years of experience in local government in the United Kingdom, Paola has been at the forefront of developing and implementing evidence-based strategies for urban regeneration, economic revitalization, and the pursuit of resilient and sustainable urban futures.

    Paola has been a driving force behind the revitalization of city centres, particularly focusing on their recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and their transition towards net-zero emissions.

    Paola's academic pursuits centre on the relationship between urban form and the quality of life. Her investigations delve deep into the nexus of health data and placemaking, shedding light on the pivotal role of urban design in shaping the well-being of communities. Her scholarly work is a testament to her commitment to creating cities that prioritize the physical and mental health of their inhabitants.
     

    Dr. Paola Pasino
    Available for Lead Expert role and Ad-hoc expertise missions
    paolapasino@hotmail.com

    Expert can perform the Lead expert role and Ad hoc expertise missions at network and programme level in relation to:

     

    1. The design and delivery of (transnational) exchange and learning activities

     

    2. Thematic expertise:
    > Strategic urban planning

     

    3. Methods and tools for integrated and participatory approaches:
    > Integrated and participatory design of strategies
    > Sustaining stakeholder engagement and translating strategies into actions

  • Sally Kneeshaw

    For over 30 years I have been working as an urban practitioner, policy maker and facilitator at EU and local level.

    I am fortunate to have worked directly with URBACT for 14 years now. I started out as Lead Expert of the Electric Vehicles in Urban Europe network, and from 2013 to 2023 have been Programme Expert. Over this period I have supported all three programme strands of transnational exchange and learning, capacity building and knowledge capitalisation. I have been in the design team of all URBACT Universities and City Festivals. As a member of the Capacity Building Task Force, I developed Guidance for Action Planning, supported studies on the integrated approach, pilot actions and co-produced new online training modules on Gender Responsive Public Procurement (GRPP). I led the Gender Equal Cities Knowledge Hub initiative, producing the first report and disseminating its powerful ideas across many platforms such as UN Habitat.

    At EU level I am also an Expert for European Urban Initiative Capacity Building team conducting Peer Reviews. I have been the moderator for two editions of the European Commission Cities Forum.

    I keep my feet on the ground working at local level in London on strategy design and project delivery. I managed the development of the London Borough of Lambeth Creative and Digital Industries Strategy, which incorporated review of workspace, cluster effects, activation of the public realm and strong focus on diversity and inclusion. I was expert for the Mayor of London’s Social Integration and Regeneration Lab and Network- a network of boroughs each with a specific place-based project to create buildings/ high streets/ open spaces that connect communities. I currently work with a multi-agency coalition to embed inclusion in the Life Sciences sector.

    I have a strong belief in and commitment to the URBACT approach, having witnessed its positive impact. The URBACT method helps cities to develop better integrated policy, to channel resources towards well-conceived, evidence based and needs-led initiatives. The transnational exchange serves to connect people, ideas and knowledge in our common mission to drive sustainability at local level.

    I look forward to supporting more city change-makers across the EU, in order to address the multiple challenges we face. Feel free to get in touch to explore new collaborations!

    Sally Kneeshaw portrait
    Available for Lead Expert role and Ad-hoc expertise missions
    sally@kneeshawconsulting.com

    Expert can perform the Lead expert role and Ad hoc expertise missions at network and programme level in relation to:

     

    1. The design and delivery of (transnational) exchange and learning activities

     

    2. Thematic expertise:
    [Culture, Equality-Diversity-Inclusion, Knowledge economy, Local economy, Urban design]

     

    3. Methods and tools for integrated and participatory approaches:
    > Integrated and participatory design of strategies
    > Sustaining stakeholder engagement and translating strategies into actions

     

  • Richard Laing

    I am Professor of Urban Collaboration at Northumbria University.

    Over the past two decades, I have developed extensive knowledge and experience of key emerging issues facing our society, including the advent of smart city technology (at both EU and local levels), sustainable urbanism, digitisation of working practices, and innovation within the built environment. This has been enabled through work concerning urban design, mobility, participation and digital visualisation.

    I have also developed skills to encourage inclusive discussion and debate, working to ensure that all ideas and voices are heard (including these recent examples in Copenhagen and Aberdeen).

    Within URBACT, I would welcome the opportunity to work with networks, projects and initiatives, and to help guide their activities through the processes of ideas generation, discussion, refinement and application. 

    Further information about me and my applied research can be found here.

    Over the past decade, I have had experience working in many areas relevant to URBACT including sustainable mobility (Interreg CARE North), healthy cities (H2020 URBANOME), sustainable port cities (Civitas PORTIS) and people-centred application of smart technologies and mobilities (Interreg PAV and Art-Forum).

    The outcomes of my work can be seen through an extensive publication record (over 100 papers), over £3.5M of external grant income, and, the supervision and examination of research degrees. These represent experiences borne of many years of effort, collaboration and activity, and which guide much of my current work concerning urbanism and emerging technologies.

    The success of projects, and especially those related to cities and sustainability, relies on open and creative discussion, informed and inclusive decision-making, and being able to identify and understand both failure and success. I look forward to bringing my experience and communication skills to URBACT during the programme.

    Available for Lead Expert role and Ad-hoc expertise missions
    richard.laing@northumbria.ac.uk

    Expert can perform the Lead expert role and Ad hoc expertise missions at network and programme level in relation to:

    1. The design and delivery of (transnational) exchange and learning activities
       
    2. Thematic expertise:
      > Strategic Urban Planning
       
    3. Methods and tools for integrated and participatory approaches:
      > Monitoring and evaluation for effective implementation
      > Sustaining engagement of stakeholders and translating strategies into actions

     

  • Citizen sensing - where people act as sensors

    __OTHER
    Bristol

    A new way of co-creating smarter cities that puts communities and their needs at the heart of innovation.

    Martha King
    Arts programme producer, Knowlewest Media Centre
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    428 100

    Summary

    ‘Smart city’ programmes are often developed and driven by the few and don’t always take into account the majority of people who live, work and collaboratively make the city. The Bristol Approach to Citizen Sensing is a new way of working that puts communities at the heart of innovation, ensuring that new technologies are developed to meet people’s needs and tackle the issues they care about, rather than being imposed on them by ‘big tech’ companies in a ‘top-down’ process. The approach enables the development of a ‘city commons’, where resources, tools, expertise and technologies are shared and used for the common good. The 6-step framework is itself a ‘commons’ tool that other organisations and groups can learn from, implement and iterate. Over 700 people were involved in more than 45 events during the pilot project. Three sets of prototype citizen sensing tools were designed and tested: tackling damp homes, food waste and mental health.

    The solutions offered by the good practice

    As a mode of good practice The Bristol Approach to Citizen Sensing framework offers cities new solutions for: • Discovering new problems and evidencing scale; • Providing inclusive participatory ways to tackle relevant city issues; • Increasing skills and empowering communities; • Developing open resources; • Creating opportunities for new business models and enterprises. On a granular level, the framework supports communities to work in more interdisciplinary ways to co-create specific solutions to their chosen issues or problems, resulting in new open commons-based resources that are created by and of benefit to citizens. For example, in the pilot project people who suffered from damp and mould in their homes came together with universities (humanities and engineering), businesses such as ARUP, hackers, open data specialists, city council representatives from housing, parks, building control and health, plus artists, architects, investors and housing associations to participate in a programme of practical workshops, “Hack Days”, making sessions and regular meetings. The group developed a ‘Damp-busting’ system which included: frog-shaped temperature and humidity sensors, digital interfaces to make sense of data, mapping tools to visualise the scale of the problem and community-trained volunteers to support actionable change using citizen-generated data as evidence.

    Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

    The Bristol Approach to Citizen Sensing helps to tackle social exclusion, poverty and environmental problems by empowering disadvantaged communities with opportunities to develop new knowledge, digital skills, open source tools and innovative strategies for interdisciplinary methodologies for co-design. Through a common based approach, this practice enables people from all backgrounds and disciplines to meaningfully engage in citizen sensing activities that help co-create new digital tools and open data sets that can provide evidence for long-term policy change.

    Based on a participatory approach

    At the heart of the framework is the principle of the commons, which is inherently participatory. ‘Commoning’ is an action that involves the sharing of resources and the collective agreement of how they will be used for the Solutions Workshop held as part of the project demonstrated the potential of The Approach to impact city services, infrastructure and new models of community action and business development. It relies on collaboration between business, local authorities, research institutions and the community to solve problems that affect citizens and areas and carry a financial cost for the city. A participatory approach is built in from the development phase and carried on through implementation. City stakeholders are mapped and brought onboard at the beginning, engaged through a series of workshops and involved in contributing to the co-designed solution. A commons principle applied throughout is ‘low floor/high ceiling’, which ensures there are no barriers to taking part (‘a low floor’) but that everyone can be challenged to the best of their abilities (‘a high ceiling’). Varying incentives, rewards and processes of onboarding at different points are also built into the practice. In e.g. our pilot ‘Dampbusting’ project councillors, technologists, artists, families, housing campaign groups, energy companies, charities, health professionals, data analysts were engaged in the participatory process: all bringing different skills and input.

    What difference has it made?

    Through the first pilot project, more than 700 people 13-80 years old were engaged in more than 45 events and workshops. The following differences were made: • Participants gained increased digital literacy, new digital skills and data awareness; • Participants were more aware of their behaviour and more open to the idea of sharing data and making change; • New networks between residents, academia, local authority and business were formed. We gathered feedback on how to integrate technologies and successfully co-design, e.g.: “Very thought provoking on many levels”, “It was interesting to explore with others”, “I liked all the input related to the technology design”, “What’s occurred to me is that, for these things to catch on, there needs to be an emotional engagement with the technology and what it can do and how it engages with one’s community. There’s not going to be an engagement with a black box in the corner. There needs to be an aesthetic and a feel and a relationship.” (Caleb Parkin, Lead Artist.) People felt that they were able to identify their needs that affected their lives and create solutions, leading to a greater feeling of empowerment. Three sets of prototype citizen sensing tools were devised, designed, deployed and tested: tackling damp homes, food waste and mental health. A framework that can be shared with other cities has been developed, and through the ENoLL, REPLICATE project and other international partnerships new ways of approaching smart city developments are being implemented.

    Why should other European cities use it?

    The Bristol Approach to Citizen Sensing framework was designed to be translated to any context. Different cities experience challenges that are unique to them, and the open nature of the framework means that it could be easily used by other cities to address their challenges. For example, Taylor’s University, Malaysia, are partnering with KWMC as part of the Smart Mobility Cities project. They participated in a sharing good practice workshop with KWMC and commented on how valuable it was to have a methodology to use that genuinely positioned a participatory approach at its heart. The Bristol Approach effectively draws in people working on similar projects, especially in research/tech and city policy, which allows for wider skills sharing and potential for future collaborations. The Bristol Approach gathers an emergent community who is supported to develop and share the necessary skills, and responds to rewards and incentives, to co-design, deploy and sustain ad hoc sensing networks that build up a new city commons, adding a layer of infrastructural value to the territory and providing opportunities for its inhabitants and local SMEs.

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  • Digital media centre

    __OTHER
    Barnsley

    Create more and better local jobs through an inspirational hub space and focused business supportsed business support

    Tracey Johnson
    Digital Media Centre Manager
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    241 200
    • Adapted by cities from
    • Adapted by cities from
    Through Enterprising Barnsley, the city of Barnsley (UK) delivers a focused programme of business support across inward investment, growth businesses, startups and business incubation centres. Delivered by a team of business development and project managers with specialist, private sector experience and knowledge, the programme puts the customers (businesses) at the heart of the process, building strong client relationships and delivering bespoke, relevant support.
    The main physical asset of the Digital Media Centre (DMC) is connected with support programmes and activities, adopting an open-door policy and co-locating the startup support service here. The DMC is a town centre hub of creative and digital businesses, which hosts regular networks and events and has recently expanded into DMC 02
    The DMC works hard to grow the digital and creative economy through clustering and community building, and also to drive demand for digital products, skills and services. It collides traditional and digital industry expertise. Enterprising Barnsley has delivered thousands of new jobs into Barnsley over recent years, and has transformed the DMC into an award-winning hub as well as attracting investment into DMC 02 and it is now developing The Seam, Barnsley’s Digital Campus which surrounds the DMCs .

    Summary

    Through Enterprising Barnsley, the city of Barnsley (UK) delivers a focused programme of business support across inward investment, growth businesses, startups and business incubation centres. Delivered by a team of business development and project managers with specialist, private sector experience and knowledge, the programme puts the customers (businesses) at the heart of the process, building strong client relationships and delivering bespoke, relevant support.
    The main physical asset of the Digital Media Centre (DMC) is connected with support programmes and activities, adopting an open-door policy and co-locating the startup support service here. The DMC is a town centre hub of creative and digital businesses, which hosts regular networks and events and has recently expanded into DMC 02
    The DMC works hard to grow the digital and creative economy through clustering and community building, and also to drive demand for digital products, skills and services. It collides traditional and digital industry expertise. Enterprising Barnsley has delivered thousands of new jobs into Barnsley over recent years, and has transformed the DMC into an award-winning hub as well as attracting investment into DMC 02 and it is now developing The Seam, Barnsley’s Digital Campus which surrounds the DMCs .

     

    The solutions offered by the good practice

    Enterprising Barnsley has built on a successful business support programme and integrated this expertise into a physical hub for high growth creative and digital businesses. The Digital Media Centre tech hubs (DMCs) are landmark hubs for creative and digital business, as well as a base for a startup programme open to any new entrepreneur. Bringing together the “soft” Enterprising Barnsley support with “hard” DMC facilities presents Barnsley as a destination for business growth.
    The solutions include:

    • Adopting an ‘open door’ policy: availability for any growing business, putting customers at the heart of the work;
    • Make space available at no or low cost to those who want to deliver activities for other businesses, or digital sector events (e.g. hack days);
    • A varied and changing programme of events, from casual meetups to networking and ‘dives’ into new tech;
    • Use digital platforms to collaborate with the digital community, generate feedback and ideas, as well as informal conversation;
    • Delivering a regular programme of free events - a monthly breakfast club and workshops for startups based on Lean Canvas;
    • Free-to-access bespoke business support for growing companies;
    • Developing own programmes using sponsorship funding, to collide digital experts with traditional businesses to drive innovation/disruption;
    • Flexible and entrepreneurial working style – going the extra mile to respond to business needs;
    • Staying connected with the cutting edge of tech, and establishing high-level networks including with academia to benefit clients.

    Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

    Enterprising Barnsley and the DMC are born of seeking to improve the social and economic wellbeing of Barnsley and its citizens through the creation of more and better jobs and businesses. Additionally, by focusing on digital and knowledge-based industries at the DMC, the future direction of travel of industry is recognised, by trying to ensure that citizens have the skills and opportunities to access higher value jobs. The DMC 01 itself is a BREEAM Excellent building, which was sensitively designed by architects as a landmark hub with environmental credentials.
    There is clear horizontal integration demonstrated by combining the DMC with our Enterprising Barnsley support programme. This is set within a vertical integration of cooperation between the municipality, other public sector agencies, education and private sectors via TechTown, our digital economy action planning network, and the relationship with our local Economic Partnership. Our current support programmes are part of a city region approach to business support which has been influenced by our existing practice.

    Based on a participatory approach

    Enterprising Barnsley emerged from collaboration between the city, businesses and the local chamber of commerce. Working with stakeholders has been a key element of the programme's success and good relationships are a foundation for our work. This approach was used to consider how best to integrate the DMC when direct management of the building was taken on. Taking on an existing space & clients necessitated building relationships, and ensuring they have a voice in how things would develop. External experts facilitated workshops using SWOT analysis and ideation techniques to identify things to address, and future needs.
    As the lead partner of the URBACT TechTown network, Barnsley developed alocal group of digital economy stakeholders, working collaboratively to develop and deliver an integrated action plan for future development of the digital sector. This includes extensive work with education, private and public sector partners on a local/regional level, with difficult conversations and facilitated workshopping of new ideas. This work carries on in the Tech Revolution Transfer Network and we actively contribute to regional policy and invest in participatory actions with tech ecosystem stakeholders such as a recent project linked to Sheffield City Region’s MIT REAP work on entrepreneurial ecosystems.
    We use a range of platforms to link across businesses and support networks. These are useful tools to foster open, honest discussion/ideation. The community 'owns' actions and can connect them with strategic city level policy/planning.
    As a team, an open door policy is central to our ethos, and work outside of office hours is possible when customers need help.

    What difference has it made?

    Since 2010, Enterprising Barnsley has supported the creation of over 1000 jobs per year. This is a gross total across ERDF-funded programmes and direct investment by BMBC. The creative and digital economy has grown from 540 businesses to 679, as indicated by mapping reports commission in 2010 and 2015 respectively.
    The Digital Media Centre has seen an increase in occupancy from 54% in April 2015 to 96% at March 2017, with an approximately 25% increase in turnover. Whilst occupancy has been impacted by Covid, it is now growing again. Significantly, digital companies in the DMC have grown in terms of job numbers, turnover and space rented. Highlights include a DMC company who forecast first year turnover of £90k/€105k and actually achieved £250k/€294. This company went on to achieve even greater growth and now is a team of 17 with turnover of £1m.

     

    Projects run through the DMC have attracted a range of funding for delivery from public and private sector sources.

     

    By intrinsically linking the TechTown Action Planning Network with the DMC, significant reach and recognition for the approach to growing the digital sector has been achieved. Working is carried out closely with partners on a regional as well as local level, and well connected into national and overseas digital sector networks. Being at the heart of a web of valuable connections makes the DMC and its projects more relevant and meaningful for the support of companies and people, as well as ensuring awareness of sector trends and developments.

     

    The Action Plan that emerged from the TechTown project has formed the basis for ‘The Seam, Barnsley’s Digital Campus’ which is an ambitious regeneration programme centred on the DMCs that will see a new district of the town centre be developed over the next 10 years. Already, DMC 02 has emerged from this plan as well as Barnsley College’s SciTech Hub for digital education, and funding is secured for active and electric vehicle travel hubs. Additionally a new ‘internet of things’ network is being installed across the town centre to support DMC and Seam activity, and Barnsley is now a testbed for a range of technologies supporting sustainable place making. We have secured ERDF investment to deliver two innovative programmes to grow the tech ecosystem (in partnership with Capital Enterprise) and drive the adoption of digital technology (in partnership with Sheffield Hallam University). We also now work closely with the University of Sheffield on entrepreneurship and Internet of Things technologies and are leading an IoT pre accelerator programme with a large network provider to support new business ideas. We have completed three IoT Tribe programmes with the most recent programme seeing ten new smart city technologies piloted in Barnsley as well as new companies locating in the DMCs.

    Transferring the practice

    Over 2.5 years, Barnsley has led the TechRevolution network, transferring its practice to 6 other cities: Bacau (Romania), Piraeus (Greece), Schiedam (Netherlands), Nyíregyháza (Hungary), Pardubice (Czech Republic), Vilanova i la Geltru (Spain). You can, in particular, check Piraeus’s Good practice here. The approach was based on the 3 elements of the Barnsley’s Good Practice, adaptable to each city’s reality: Enterprising Barnsley, Digital Media Centre and Spin-off. In Barnsley, TechRevolution has helped to continue stakeholder engagement and to develop and deliver significant improvements and expansions to our local, regional and national tech sector support and policy. The final outputs are all available on the URBACT website. TechRevolution might also be reloaed with a new Transfer Network starting from June 2021.

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